TobnerPaquetteMessier2013

Reference

Tobner, C.M., Paquette, A. and Messier, C. (2013) Interspecific coordination and intraspecific plasticity of fine root traits in North American temperate tree species. Frontiers in Plant Science, 4(JUL). (Scopus )

Abstract

Fine roots play an important role in nutrient and water absorption and hence overall tree performance. However, current understanding of the ecological role of belowground traits lags considerably behind those of aboveground traits. In this study, we used data on specific root length (SRL), fine root diameter (D) and branching intensity (BI) of two datasets to examine interspecific trait coordination as well as intraspecific trait variation across ontogenetic stage and soil conditions (i.e., plasticity). The first dataset included saplings of 12 North American temperate tree species grown in monocultures in a common garden experiment to examine interspecific trait coordination. The second dataset included adult and juvenile individuals of four species (present in both datasets) co-occurring in natural forests on contrasting soils (i.e., humid organic, mesic, and xeric podzolic).The three fine root traits investigated were strongly coordinated, with high SRL being related to low D and high BI. Fine root traits and aboveground life-strategies (i.e., relative growth rate) were weakly coordinated and never significant. Intraspecific responses to changes in ontogenetic stage or soil conditions were trait dependent. SRL was significantly higher in juveniles compared to adults for Abies balsamea and Acer rubrum, but did not vary with soil condition. BI did not vary significantly with either ontogeny or soil conditions, while D was generally significantly lower in juveniles and higher in humid organic soils. D also had the least total variability most of which was due to changes in the environment (plasticity). This study brings support for the emerging evidence for interspecific root trait coordination in trees. It also indicates that intraspecific responses to both ontogeny and soil conditions are trait dependent and less concerted. D appears to be a better indicator of environmental change than SRL and BI. © 2013 Tobner, Paquette and Messier.

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@ARTICLE { TobnerPaquetteMessier2013,
    AUTHOR = { Tobner, C.M. and Paquette, A. and Messier, C. },
    TITLE = { Interspecific coordination and intraspecific plasticity of fine root traits in North American temperate tree species },
    JOURNAL = { Frontiers in Plant Science },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 4 },
    NUMBER = { JUL },
    NOTE = { cited By (since 1996)2 },
    ABSTRACT = { Fine roots play an important role in nutrient and water absorption and hence overall tree performance. However, current understanding of the ecological role of belowground traits lags considerably behind those of aboveground traits. In this study, we used data on specific root length (SRL), fine root diameter (D) and branching intensity (BI) of two datasets to examine interspecific trait coordination as well as intraspecific trait variation across ontogenetic stage and soil conditions (i.e., plasticity). The first dataset included saplings of 12 North American temperate tree species grown in monocultures in a common garden experiment to examine interspecific trait coordination. The second dataset included adult and juvenile individuals of four species (present in both datasets) co-occurring in natural forests on contrasting soils (i.e., humid organic, mesic, and xeric podzolic).The three fine root traits investigated were strongly coordinated, with high SRL being related to low D and high BI. Fine root traits and aboveground life-strategies (i.e., relative growth rate) were weakly coordinated and never significant. Intraspecific responses to changes in ontogenetic stage or soil conditions were trait dependent. SRL was significantly higher in juveniles compared to adults for Abies balsamea and Acer rubrum, but did not vary with soil condition. BI did not vary significantly with either ontogeny or soil conditions, while D was generally significantly lower in juveniles and higher in humid organic soils. D also had the least total variability most of which was due to changes in the environment (plasticity). This study brings support for the emerging evidence for interspecific root trait coordination in trees. It also indicates that intraspecific responses to both ontogeny and soil conditions are trait dependent and less concerted. D appears to be a better indicator of environmental change than SRL and BI. © 2013 Tobner, Paquette and Messier. },
    AFFILIATION = { Département des Sciences Biologiques, Center for Forest Research, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; Département des Ressources Naturelles, Institut des Sciences de la Forêt Tempérée, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Ripon, QC, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 242 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Branching intensity; Fine root diameter; Functional traits; Phenotypic plasticity; Specific root length; Tree fine roots },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84891084020&partnerID=40&md5=419925a764ae9676f7c8468df6cda2f0 },
}

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