PelletierPaquetteMbindoEtAl2018

Reference

Pelletier, J., Paquette, A., Mbindo, K., Zimba, N., Siampale, A., Chendauka, B., Siangulube, F., Roberts, J.W. (2018) Carbon sink despite large deforestation in African tropical dry forests (miombo woodlands). Environmental Research Letters, 13(9). (Scopus )

Abstract

Direct and indirect human impacts may be causing widespread vegetation changes African tropical dry forests (TDFs). This study provides the first field-based large-scale assessment of vegetation changes for the miombo region, using nation-wide re-measured permanent plots for the Republic of Zambia. Using path analysis, a technique used to describe and quantify causal relationships, we investigated the drivers of change for the 2006-2014 period, under different land-use and productivity trajectories. We assessed the change in vegetation metrics representing stand structure and tree diversity, identified causal factors for species richness, basal area, and productivity and compared the biomass change of different species. We assessed carbon emissions and absorptions from forestlands and used error propagation and sensitivity analysis to quantify uncertainty. Our results suggest that Zambia's TDFs are resilient in the face of human activities, with significant biomass gains observed in the re-measured plots over the country. However, the proximity to roads, fragmentation by other land uses, and to a lesser extent fire occurrence were found to negatively affect productivity. We found that biomass gains were concentrated in several dominant species, mostly belonging to a single subfamily of non-nodulating legumes (Fabaceae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae) characteristic of the region. Our results indicate that Zambia's TDFs have been acting as an overall carbon sink, despite large carbon emissions from land-cover change. Decline in biomass for certain dominant species signal a risk of over-exploitation. We also identified important differences in plant diversity and functional traits between miombo woodlands and other types of African savanna vegetation, signaling differences in ecological processes at play. These results illustrate the ecological complexity and diversity of Africa's vegetation, and caution against overgeneralizations of ecological processes in the context of global change and carbon management. Future research should focus on understanding the observed species-specific biomass gain and identifying its potential drivers. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { PelletierPaquetteMbindoEtAl2018,
    AUTHOR = { Pelletier, J. and Paquette, A. and Mbindo, K. and Zimba, N. and Siampale, A. and Chendauka, B. and Siangulube, F. and Roberts, J.W. },
    TITLE = { Carbon sink despite large deforestation in African tropical dry forests (miombo woodlands) },
    JOURNAL = { Environmental Research Letters },
    YEAR = { 2018 },
    VOLUME = { 13 },
    NUMBER = { 9 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Direct and indirect human impacts may be causing widespread vegetation changes African tropical dry forests (TDFs). This study provides the first field-based large-scale assessment of vegetation changes for the miombo region, using nation-wide re-measured permanent plots for the Republic of Zambia. Using path analysis, a technique used to describe and quantify causal relationships, we investigated the drivers of change for the 2006-2014 period, under different land-use and productivity trajectories. We assessed the change in vegetation metrics representing stand structure and tree diversity, identified causal factors for species richness, basal area, and productivity and compared the biomass change of different species. We assessed carbon emissions and absorptions from forestlands and used error propagation and sensitivity analysis to quantify uncertainty. Our results suggest that Zambia's TDFs are resilient in the face of human activities, with significant biomass gains observed in the re-measured plots over the country. However, the proximity to roads, fragmentation by other land uses, and to a lesser extent fire occurrence were found to negatively affect productivity. We found that biomass gains were concentrated in several dominant species, mostly belonging to a single subfamily of non-nodulating legumes (Fabaceae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae) characteristic of the region. Our results indicate that Zambia's TDFs have been acting as an overall carbon sink, despite large carbon emissions from land-cover change. Decline in biomass for certain dominant species signal a risk of over-exploitation. We also identified important differences in plant diversity and functional traits between miombo woodlands and other types of African savanna vegetation, signaling differences in ecological processes at play. These results illustrate the ecological complexity and diversity of Africa's vegetation, and caution against overgeneralizations of ecological processes in the context of global change and carbon management. Future research should focus on understanding the observed species-specific biomass gain and identifying its potential drivers. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. },
    AFFILIATION = { Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Atkinson Center for A Sustainable Future, Ithaca, NY, United States; Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Rd, Falmouth, MA 02540-1644, United States; Université du Québeca Montréal, Département de Sciences Biologiques, Centre for Forest Research, Centre-ville Station, PO Box 8888, Montreal, QC 3C 3P8, Canada; Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources, Forestry Department, PO Box, Lusaka, 50042, Zambia; Green Basin Naturals 'Former Botanical Curator at Forestry Research Branch, Forestry Dept.- Integrated Land Use Assessment ILUA II Project, Plot 16981 Mass media, Lusaka, Zambia; Food and Agriculture Organization- 'Integrated Land Use Assessment ILUA II Project', 5 Addis Ababa Drive, PO Box 30563, Lusaka, Zambia },
    ART_NUMBER = { 094017 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { aboveground biomass; land-use/cover change; miombo woodlands; productivity; terrestrial carbon sink; tropical dry forests },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1088/1748-9326/aadc9a },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85055858803&doi=10.1088%2f1748-9326%2faadc9a&partnerID=40&md5=9d1d3ef6753fbf83b9f99a9859fe4c1d },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - ABC CBA 2020 ****************** **********************************************************

31 mai au 4 juin 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...