ArchambaultPaquetteMessierEtAl2019

Reference

Archambault, C., Paquette, A., Messier, C., Khlifa, R., Munson, A.D. and Handa, I.T. (2019) Evergreenness influences fine root growth more than tree diversity in a common garden experiment. Oecologia, 189(4):1027-1039. (URL )

Abstract

Recent studies have reported positive net diversity effects on aboveground tree growth. However, whether similar effects occur belowground through root investment, and whether such effects are related to evergreenness of tree communities, is less clear. Here we studied vertical distribution of standing fine root biomass of twelve North American temperate tree species planted in a common garden tree diversity experiment of varying species richness and evergreenness to test whether belowground niche complementarity of trees could explain positive diversity effects reported aboveground. We tested two alternative hypotheses: trees in mixtures increase uptake of soil resources (1) by increasing vertical root stratification and/or producing a greater fine root density (mg cm−3) or (2) by producing similar or fewer fine roots that are potentially more efficient. Additionally, we hypothesized that proportional allocation to belowground biomass increases with evergreenness of tree communities. Fine roots were sampled in six layers of 5-10 cm, from 0 to 40 cm depth in single-, two- and four-species mixtures. We did not observe an effect of species richness on rooting depth or root density, refuting the hypothesis that aboveground overyielding in tree mixtures is linked to fine root overyielding. Rather, we observed a significant negative diversity effect (− 7.6%) on total fine root density, suggesting overall less investment to fine roots with increasing diversity. The strong positive effect of evergreeness on proportional allocation to fine roots over aboveground parts suggests that deciduous tree roots may be generally more efficient at absorbing soil resources, at least in the early years after tree establishment.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { ArchambaultPaquetteMessierEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { Archambault, C. and Paquette, A. and Messier, C. and Khlifa, R. and Munson, A.D. and Handa, I.T. },
    TITLE = { Evergreenness influences fine root growth more than tree diversity in a common garden experiment },
    JOURNAL = { Oecologia },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 189 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    PAGES = { 1027-1039 },
    MONTH = { Apr },
    ISSN = { 1432-1939 },
    ABSTRACT = { Recent studies have reported positive net diversity effects on aboveground tree growth. However, whether similar effects occur belowground through root investment, and whether such effects are related to evergreenness of tree communities, is less clear. Here we studied vertical distribution of standing fine root biomass of twelve North American temperate tree species planted in a common garden tree diversity experiment of varying species richness and evergreenness to test whether belowground niche complementarity of trees could explain positive diversity effects reported aboveground. We tested two alternative hypotheses: trees in mixtures increase uptake of soil resources (1) by increasing vertical root stratification and/or producing a greater fine root density (mg cm−3) or (2) by producing similar or fewer fine roots that are potentially more efficient. Additionally, we hypothesized that proportional allocation to belowground biomass increases with evergreenness of tree communities. Fine roots were sampled in six layers of 5-10 cm, from 0 to 40 cm depth in single-, two- and four-species mixtures. We did not observe an effect of species richness on rooting depth or root density, refuting the hypothesis that aboveground overyielding in tree mixtures is linked to fine root overyielding. Rather, we observed a significant negative diversity effect (− 7.6%) on total fine root density, suggesting overall less investment to fine roots with increasing diversity. The strong positive effect of evergreeness on proportional allocation to fine roots over aboveground parts suggests that deciduous tree roots may be generally more efficient at absorbing soil resources, at least in the early years after tree establishment. },
    DAY = { 01 },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s00442-019-04373-5 },
    URL = { https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-019-04373-5 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Mycorhizes_2019 ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...