MunsonTimmer1995

Reference

Munson, A.D. and Timmer, V.R. (1995) Soil-Nitrogen Dynamics and Nutrition of Pine Following Silvicultural Treatments in Boreal and Great-Lakes St-Lawrence Plantations. Forest Ecology and Management, 76(1-3):169-179.

Abstract

Six years after establishment of a boreal forest plantation (Ontario, Canada), the impact of intensive silvicultural treatments on soil nitrogen (N) reserves, N availability and nutrition of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) was examined. Treatments of scarification (blade removal of entire forest floor), fertilizer application (annually) and vegetation control (annually for 4 years) were applied in a factorial design, and the site was subsequently planted to native conifer species. In the sixth season after transplanting, no significant impacts of treatments on total N reserves in the humus or surface mineral soil were noted. Scarification markedly reduced both soil ammonium (NH4-N) and nitrate (NO3-N) availability, especially early in the growing season. The positive effect of vegetation control on NH4-N and NO3-N availability was also significantly reduced by scarification. Vegetation control significantly increased NH4-N and NO3-N availability in the mid to late growing season, and highest levels of NO3-N (ten times greater than control) were noted with combined fertilization and vegetation control. We compared the nutritional and growth response of jack pine on the boreal site with white pine (Pinus strobus L.) response to the same treatments on a more southern Great Lakes-St. Lawrence forest site. Response to treatments was interpreted by vector analysis, using crown biomass estimates, rather than needle biomass, to integrate longer term response to treatment. For both species, treatments including vegetation control by herbicide resulted in greater crown biomass and N accumulation; the greatest response was observed following the three treatments combined: scarification, fertilization and vegetation control. White pine had a stronger relative response to treatments than the boreal species, jack pine, supporting the hypothesis that the boreal species does not show as great an acclimation response to changing resource availability.

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@ARTICLE { MunsonTimmer1995,
    AUTHOR = { Munson, A.D. and Timmer, V.R. },
    TITLE = { Soil-Nitrogen Dynamics and Nutrition of Pine Following Silvicultural Treatments in Boreal and Great-Lakes St-Lawrence Plantations },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Ecology and Management },
    YEAR = { 1995 },
    VOLUME = { 76 },
    PAGES = { 169-179 },
    NUMBER = { 1-3 },
    NOTE = { Times Cited: 18 Article English Cited References Count: 29 Tc762 },
    ABSTRACT = { Six years after establishment of a boreal forest plantation (Ontario, Canada), the impact of intensive silvicultural treatments on soil nitrogen (N) reserves, N availability and nutrition of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) was examined. Treatments of scarification (blade removal of entire forest floor), fertilizer application (annually) and vegetation control (annually for 4 years) were applied in a factorial design, and the site was subsequently planted to native conifer species. In the sixth season after transplanting, no significant impacts of treatments on total N reserves in the humus or surface mineral soil were noted. Scarification markedly reduced both soil ammonium (NH4-N) and nitrate (NO3-N) availability, especially early in the growing season. The positive effect of vegetation control on NH4-N and NO3-N availability was also significantly reduced by scarification. Vegetation control significantly increased NH4-N and NO3-N availability in the mid to late growing season, and highest levels of NO3-N (ten times greater than control) were noted with combined fertilization and vegetation control. We compared the nutritional and growth response of jack pine on the boreal site with white pine (Pinus strobus L.) response to the same treatments on a more southern Great Lakes-St. Lawrence forest site. Response to treatments was interpreted by vector analysis, using crown biomass estimates, rather than needle biomass, to integrate longer term response to treatment. For both species, treatments including vegetation control by herbicide resulted in greater crown biomass and N accumulation; the greatest response was observed following the three treatments combined: scarification, fertilization and vegetation control. White pine had a stronger relative response to treatments than the boreal species, jack pine, supporting the hypothesis that the boreal species does not show as great an acclimation response to changing resource availability. },
    KEYWORDS = { nitrogen fertilizer herbicide scarification pinus banksiana environmental-conditions growth establishment nitrification availability ecosystems impacts nitrate spruce },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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