PierceNegreirosCeraboliniEtAl2017

Référence

Pierce, S., Negreiros, D., Cerabolini, B.E.L., Kattge, J., Diaz, S., Kleyer, M., Shipley, B., Wright, S.J., Soudzilovskaia, N.A., Onipchenko, V.G., van Bodegom, P.M., Frenette-Dussault, C., Weiher, E., Pinho, B.X., Cornelissen, J.H.C., Grime, J.P., Thompson, K., Hunt, R., Wilson, P.J., Buffa, G., Nyakunga, O.C., Reich, P.B., Caccianiga, M., Mangili, F., Ceriani, R.M., Luzzaro, A., Brusa, G., Siefert, A., Barbosa, N.P.U., Chapin, F.S., III, Cornwell, W.K., Fang, J., Fernandes, G.W., Garnier, E., Le Stradic, S., Penuelas, J., Melo, F.P.L., Slaviero, A., Tabarelli, M. and Tampucci, D. (2017) A global method for calculating plant CSR ecological strategies applied across biomes world-wide. Functional Ecology, 31(2):444-457. (Scopus )

Résumé

Competitor, stress-tolerator, ruderal (CSR) theory is a prominent plant functional strategy scheme previously applied to local floras. Globally, the wide geographic and phylogenetic coverage of available values of leaf area (LA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) (representing, respectively, interspecific variation in plant size and conservative vs. acquisitive resource economics) promises the general application of CSR strategies across biomes, including the tropical forests hosting a large proportion of Earth's diversity. We used trait variation for 3068 tracheophytes (representing 198 families, six continents and 14 biomes) to create a globally calibrated CSR strategy calculator tool and investigate strategy–environment relationships across biomes world-wide. Due to disparity in trait availability globally, co-inertia analysis was used to check correspondence between a ‘wide geographic coverage, few traits’ data set and a ‘restricted coverage, many traits’ subset of 371 species for which 14 whole-plant, flowering, seed and leaf traits (including leaf nitrogen content) were available. CSR strategy/environment relationships within biomes were investigated using fourth-corner and RLQ analyses to determine strategy/climate specializations. Strong, significant concordance (RV = 0·597; P < 0·0001) was evident between the 14 trait multivariate space and when only LA, LDMC and SLA were used. Biomes such as tropical moist broadleaf forests exhibited strategy convergence (i.e. clustered around a CS/CSR median; C:S:R = 43:42:15%), with CS-selection associated with warm, stable situations (lesser temperature seasonality), with greater annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. Other biomes were characterized by strategy divergence: for example, deserts varied between xeromorphic perennials such as Larrea divaricata, classified as S-selected (C:S:R = 1:99:0%) and broadly R-selected annual herbs (e.g. Claytonia perfoliata; R/CR-selected; C:S:R = 21:0:79%). Strategy convergence was evident for several growth habits (e.g. trees) but not others (forbs). The CSR strategies of vascular plants can now be compared quantitatively within and between biomes at the global scale. Through known linkages between underlying leaf traits and growth rates, herbivory and decomposition rates, this method and the strategy–environment relationships it elucidates will help to predict which kinds of species may assemble in response to changes in biogeochemical cycles, climate and land use. © 2016 The Authors. Functional Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society

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@ARTICLE { PierceNegreirosCeraboliniEtAl2017,
    AUTHOR = { Pierce, S. and Negreiros, D. and Cerabolini, B.E.L. and Kattge, J. and Diaz, S. and Kleyer, M. and Shipley, B. and Wright, S.J. and Soudzilovskaia, N.A. and Onipchenko, V.G. and van Bodegom, P.M. and Frenette-Dussault, C. and Weiher, E. and Pinho, B.X. and Cornelissen, J.H.C. and Grime, J.P. and Thompson, K. and Hunt, R. and Wilson, P.J. and Buffa, G. and Nyakunga, O.C. and Reich, P.B. and Caccianiga, M. and Mangili, F. and Ceriani, R.M. and Luzzaro, A. and Brusa, G. and Siefert, A. and Barbosa, N.P.U. and Chapin, F.S., III and Cornwell, W.K. and Fang, J. and Fernandes, G.W. and Garnier, E. and Le Stradic, S. and Penuelas, J. and Melo, F.P.L. and Slaviero, A. and Tabarelli, M. and Tampucci, D. },
    TITLE = { A global method for calculating plant CSR ecological strategies applied across biomes world-wide },
    JOURNAL = { Functional Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 31 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    PAGES = { 444-457 },
    NOTE = { cited By 6 },
    ABSTRACT = { Competitor, stress-tolerator, ruderal (CSR) theory is a prominent plant functional strategy scheme previously applied to local floras. Globally, the wide geographic and phylogenetic coverage of available values of leaf area (LA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) (representing, respectively, interspecific variation in plant size and conservative vs. acquisitive resource economics) promises the general application of CSR strategies across biomes, including the tropical forests hosting a large proportion of Earth's diversity. We used trait variation for 3068 tracheophytes (representing 198 families, six continents and 14 biomes) to create a globally calibrated CSR strategy calculator tool and investigate strategy–environment relationships across biomes world-wide. Due to disparity in trait availability globally, co-inertia analysis was used to check correspondence between a ‘wide geographic coverage, few traits’ data set and a ‘restricted coverage, many traits’ subset of 371 species for which 14 whole-plant, flowering, seed and leaf traits (including leaf nitrogen content) were available. CSR strategy/environment relationships within biomes were investigated using fourth-corner and RLQ analyses to determine strategy/climate specializations. Strong, significant concordance (RV = 0·597; P < 0·0001) was evident between the 14 trait multivariate space and when only LA, LDMC and SLA were used. Biomes such as tropical moist broadleaf forests exhibited strategy convergence (i.e. clustered around a CS/CSR median; C:S:R = 43:42:15%), with CS-selection associated with warm, stable situations (lesser temperature seasonality), with greater annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. Other biomes were characterized by strategy divergence: for example, deserts varied between xeromorphic perennials such as Larrea divaricata, classified as S-selected (C:S:R = 1:99:0%) and broadly R-selected annual herbs (e.g. Claytonia perfoliata; R/CR-selected; C:S:R = 21:0:79%). Strategy convergence was evident for several growth habits (e.g. trees) but not others (forbs). The CSR strategies of vascular plants can now be compared quantitatively within and between biomes at the global scale. Through known linkages between underlying leaf traits and growth rates, herbivory and decomposition rates, this method and the strategy–environment relationships it elucidates will help to predict which kinds of species may assemble in response to changes in biogeochemical cycles, climate and land use. © 2016 The Authors. Functional Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (DiSAA), University of Milan, Via G. Celoria 2, Milan, Italy; Ecologia Evolutiva e Biodiversidade/DBG, ICB/Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 486, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Via J.H. Dunant 3, Varese, Italy; Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, P.O. Box 100164, Jena, Germany; Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET-UNC) and FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Vélez Sarsfield 299, 2° piso. 5000, Córdoba, Argentina; Department of Biology, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany; Département de Biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado, Balboa, Panama; Institute of Environmental Sciences CML, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 2, Leiden, Netherlands; Department of Geobotany, Faculty of Biology, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation; Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI, United States; Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, Recife, Brazil; Sub-Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1085, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield, United Kingdom; Innovation Centre, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, United Kingdom; Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca'Foscari of Venice, Campo Celestia 2737b – Castello, Venice, Italy; College of African Wildlife Management, Mweka (CAWM), Moshi, Tanzania; Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, 530 Cleveland Ave. N., St. Paul, MN, United States; Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; Department of Biosciences, University of Milan, Via G. Celoria 26, Milano, Italy; The Native Flora Centre (Centro Flora Autoctona; CFA), c/o Consorzio Parco Monte Barro, via Bertarelli 11, Galbiate, LC, Italy; Department of Evolution and Ecology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, United States; Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States; Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiangshan, Beijing, China; Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; CNRS, Centre d’Écologie Fonctionnelle et Évolutive (CEFE) (UMR 5175), 1919 Route de Mende, Montpellier Cedex 5, France; Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Biodiversity and Landscape Unit, University of Liege, Gembloux, Belgium; Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-CSIC-UAB, CSIC, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { community assembly; comparative ecology; Grime's CSR triangle; plant economics spectrum; plant functional type; survival strategy; universal adaptive strategy theory },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/1365-2435.12722 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84986275797&doi=10.1111%2f1365-2435.12722&partnerID=40&md5=2479beb7f2df1b550fc094781467b601 },
}

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