ShipleyVu2002

Référence

Shipley, B. and Vu, T.T. (2002) Dry matter content as a measure of dry matter concentration in plants and their parts. New Phytologist, 153(2):359-364.

Résumé

This study compared the predictive ability of dry matter content (DMC, dry mass per fresh mass) of leaves, stems, roots and entire plants in relation to dry matter concentration (D, dry mass per volume of plant organ). Data came from 28 species of field-collected plants (woody and herbaceous) and 17 species of herbaceous plants grown in hydroponic sand culture. Specific leaf areas were also measured. Dry matter content of the herbaceous plants grown in sand culture varied more between tissue types than did dry matter concentration but the correlation among plant parts was stronger when using DMC. Means and standard errors for DMC (g g-1) were 0.212 ± 0.009 (leaves), 0.176 ±0.012 (support tissues) and 0.170 ± 0.021 (roots); for D (g cm-3) the values were 0.158 ±0.010 (leaves), 0.168±0.017 (support tissues) and 0.153 ± 0.013 (roots). Leaf DMC provided approximate estimates of leaf D (r = 0.76) for the field-collected plants but sclerophyllous leaves from shrubs restricted to acidic bogs proved to be outliers. The relationship between these two variables was stronger in the herbaceous species grown in sand culture, especially so for whole plant estimates (r = 0.91). Dry matter content and dry matter concentration were equally good predictors of specific leaf area. © New Phytologist (2002).

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@ARTICLE { ShipleyVu2002,
    AUTHOR = { Shipley, B. and Vu, T.T. },
    TITLE = { Dry matter content as a measure of dry matter concentration in plants and their parts },
    JOURNAL = { New Phytologist },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 153 },
    PAGES = { 359-364 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    NOTE = { 0028646X (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 11 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: NEPHA doi: 10.1046/j.0028-646X.2001.00320.x Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Shipley, B.; Departement de Biologie; Universite? de Sherbrooke Sherbrooke (Qc) J1K 2R1, Canada; email: bshipley@courrier.usherb.ca References: Field, C., Mooney, H.A., The photosynthesis-nitrogen relationship in wild plants (1986) On the economy of plant form and function, pp. 25-55. , Givnish TJ, ed. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; Garnier, E., Shipley, B., Roumet, C., Laurent, G., A standardized protocol for the determination of specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content (2001) Functional Ecology, 15, pp. 688-695; Lucas, P.W., Pereira, B., Estimation of the fracture toughness of leaves (1990) Functional Ecology, 4, pp. 819-822; Marie-Victorin, F., (1964) Flore laurentienne, , Montreal, Quebec: Les Presses de l'Universite? de Montreal; Muller, B., Garnier, E., Components of relative growth rate and sensitivity to nitrogen availability in annual and perennial species of Bromus (1990) Oecologia, 84, pp. 513-518; Poorter, H., Remkes, C., Leaf area ratio and net assimilation rate of 24 species differing in relative growth rate (1990) Oecologia, 83, pp. 553-559; Reich, P.B., Walters, M.B., Ellsworth, D.S., Leaf life-span in relation to leaf, plant, and stand characteristics among diverse ecosystems (1992) Ecological Monographs, 62, pp. 365-392; Reich, P.B., Walters, M.B., Ellsworth, D.S., From tropics to tundra: Global convergence in plant functioning (1997) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 94, pp. 13730-13734; Roderick, M.L., On the measurement of growth with applications to the modelling and analysis of plant growth (2000) Functional Ecology, 14, pp. 244-251; Roderick, M.L., Berry, S.L., Noble, I.R., A framework for understanding the relationship between environment and vegetation based on the surface area to Volume ratio of leaves (2000) Functional Ecology, 14, pp. 423-437; Roderick, M.L., Berry, S.L., Noble, I.R., Farquhar, G.D., A theoretical approach to linking the composition and morphology with the function of leaves (1999) Functional Ecology, 13, pp. 683-695; Roderick, M.L., Berry, S.L., Saunders, A.R., Noble, I.R., On the relationship between the composition, morphology and function of leaves (1999) Functional Ecology, 13, pp. 696-710; Shipley, B., Plasticity in relative growth rate and its components following a change in irradiance (2000) Plant, Cell \& Environment, 23, pp. 1207-1216; Shipley, B., Lechowicz, M.J., The functional coordination of leaf morphology and gase exchange in 40 wetland plant species (2000) Ecoscience, 7, pp. 183-194; (1999) S-PLUS 2000 User's Guide, , Seattle, WA, USA: MathSoft; Wilson, P.J., Thompson, K., Hodgson, J.G., Specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content as alternative predictors of plant strategies (1999) New Phytologist, 143, pp. 155-162. },
    ABSTRACT = { This study compared the predictive ability of dry matter content (DMC, dry mass per fresh mass) of leaves, stems, roots and entire plants in relation to dry matter concentration (D, dry mass per volume of plant organ). Data came from 28 species of field-collected plants (woody and herbaceous) and 17 species of herbaceous plants grown in hydroponic sand culture. Specific leaf areas were also measured. Dry matter content of the herbaceous plants grown in sand culture varied more between tissue types than did dry matter concentration but the correlation among plant parts was stronger when using DMC. Means and standard errors for DMC (g g-1) were 0.212 ± 0.009 (leaves), 0.176 ±0.012 (support tissues) and 0.170 ± 0.021 (roots); for D (g cm-3) the values were 0.158 ±0.010 (leaves), 0.168±0.017 (support tissues) and 0.153 ± 0.013 (roots). Leaf DMC provided approximate estimates of leaf D (r = 0.76) for the field-collected plants but sclerophyllous leaves from shrubs restricted to acidic bogs proved to be outliers. The relationship between these two variables was stronger in the herbaceous species grown in sand culture, especially so for whole plant estimates (r = 0.91). Dry matter content and dry matter concentration were equally good predictors of specific leaf area. © New Phytologist (2002). },
    KEYWORDS = { Dry matter concentration Dry matter content Mass concentration of dry matter Specific leaf area Tissue density dry matter leaf area plant },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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