BergeronGauthierKafkaEtAl2001

Référence

Bergeron, Y., Gauthier, S., Kafka, V., Lefort, P., Lesieur, D. (2001) Natural fire frequency for the eastern Canadian boreal forest: Consequencesfor sustainable forestry. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 31(3):384-391.

Résumé

Given that fire is the most important disturbance of the boreal forest,climatically induced changes in fire frequency (i.e., area burntper year) can have important consequences on the resulting forestmosaic age-class distribution and composition. Using archives anddendroecological data we reconstructed the fire frequency in fourlarge sectors along a transect from eastern Ontario to central Quebec.Results showed a dramatic decrease in fire frequency that beganin the mid-19th century and has been accentuated during the 20thcentury. Although all areas showed a similar temporal decrease inarea burned, we observed a gradual increase in fire frequency fromthe west to Abitibi east, followed by a slight decrease in centralQuebec. The global warming that has been occurring since the endof the Little Ice Age (1850) may have created a climate less proneto large forest fires in the eastern boreal forest of North America.This interpretation is corroborated by predictions of a decreasein forest fires for that region of the boreal forest in the future.A longer fire cycle (i.e., the time needed to burn an area equivalentto the study area) has important consequences for sustainable forestmanagement of the boreal forest of eastern Canada. When consideringthe important proportion of overmature and old-growth stands inthe landscape resulting from the elongation of the fire cycles,it becomes difficult to justify clear-cutting practices over allthe entire area as well as short rotations as a means to emulatenatural disturbances. Alternative practices involving the uses ofvariable proportion of clear, partial, and selective cutting arediscussed.

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@ARTICLE { BergeronGauthierKafkaEtAl2001,
    AUTHOR = { Bergeron, Y. and Gauthier, S. and Kafka, V. and Lefort, P. and Lesieur,D. },
    TITLE = { Natural fire frequency for the eastern Canadian boreal forest: Consequencesfor sustainable forestry },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Forest Research },
    YEAR = { 2001 },
    VOLUME = { 31 },
    PAGES = { 384-391 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Given that fire is the most important disturbance of the boreal forest,climatically induced changes in fire frequency (i.e., area burntper year) can have important consequences on the resulting forestmosaic age-class distribution and composition. Using archives anddendroecological data we reconstructed the fire frequency in fourlarge sectors along a transect from eastern Ontario to central Quebec.Results showed a dramatic decrease in fire frequency that beganin the mid-19th century and has been accentuated during the 20thcentury. Although all areas showed a similar temporal decrease inarea burned, we observed a gradual increase in fire frequency fromthe west to Abitibi east, followed by a slight decrease in centralQuebec. The global warming that has been occurring since the endof the Little Ice Age (1850) may have created a climate less proneto large forest fires in the eastern boreal forest of North America.This interpretation is corroborated by predictions of a decreasein forest fires for that region of the boreal forest in the future.A longer fire cycle (i.e., the time needed to burn an area equivalentto the study area) has important consequences for sustainable forestmanagement of the boreal forest of eastern Canada. When consideringthe important proportion of overmature and old-growth stands inthe landscape resulting from the elongation of the fire cycles,it becomes difficult to justify clear-cutting practices over allthe entire area as well as short rotations as a means to emulatenatural disturbances. Alternative practices involving the uses ofvariable proportion of clear, partial, and selective cutting arediscussed. },
    KEYWORDS = { Climatology Data reduction Fire protection Global warming Fire frequencyForestry boreal forest climate change fire history forest managementsustainability Canada },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.04 },
}

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