LegagneuxGauthierLecomteEtAl2014

Référence

Legagneux, P., Gauthier, G., Lecomte, N., Schmidt, N.M., Reid, D., Cadieux, M.-C., Berteaux, D., Beªty, J., Krebs, C.J., Ims, R.A., Yoccoz, N.G., Morrison, R.I.G., Leroux, S.J., Loreau, M., Gravel, D. (2014) Arctic ecosystem structure and functioning shaped by climate and herbivore body size. Nature Climate Change, 4(5):379-383. (Scopus )

Résumé

Significant progress has been made in our understanding of species-level responses to climate change, but upscaling to entire ecosystems remains a challenge. This task is particularly urgent in the Arctic, where global warming is most pronounced. Here we report the results of an international collaboration on the direct and indirect effects of climate on the functioning of Arctic terrestrial ecosystems. Our data from seven terrestrial food webs spread along a wide range of latitudes (a Ì‚1/41,500 km) and climates (" mean July temperature = 8.5 °C) across the circumpolar world show the effects of climate on tundra primary production, food-web structure and species interaction strength. The intensity of predation on lower trophic levels increased significantly with temperature, at approximately 4.5% per °C. Temperature also affected trophic interactions through an indirect effect on food-web structure (that is, diversity and number of interactions). Herbivore body size was a major determinant of predator-prey interactions, as interaction strength was positively related to the predator-prey size ratio, with large herbivores mostly escaping predation. There is potential for climate warming to cause a switch from bottom-up to top-down regulation of herbivores. These results are critical to resolving the debate on the regulation of tundra and other terrestrial ecosystems exposed to global change. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { LegagneuxGauthierLecomteEtAl2014,
    AUTHOR = { Legagneux, P. and Gauthier, G. and Lecomte, N. and Schmidt, N.M. and Reid, D. and Cadieux, M.-C. and Berteaux, D. and Beªty, J. and Krebs, C.J. and Ims, R.A. and Yoccoz, N.G. and Morrison, R.I.G. and Leroux, S.J. and Loreau, M. and Gravel, D. },
    TITLE = { Arctic ecosystem structure and functioning shaped by climate and herbivore body size },
    JOURNAL = { Nature Climate Change },
    YEAR = { 2014 },
    VOLUME = { 4 },
    PAGES = { 379-383 },
    NUMBER = { 5 },
    NOTE = { cited By 10 },
    ABSTRACT = { Significant progress has been made in our understanding of species-level responses to climate change, but upscaling to entire ecosystems remains a challenge. This task is particularly urgent in the Arctic, where global warming is most pronounced. Here we report the results of an international collaboration on the direct and indirect effects of climate on the functioning of Arctic terrestrial ecosystems. Our data from seven terrestrial food webs spread along a wide range of latitudes (a Ì‚1/41,500 km) and climates (" mean July temperature = 8.5 °C) across the circumpolar world show the effects of climate on tundra primary production, food-web structure and species interaction strength. The intensity of predation on lower trophic levels increased significantly with temperature, at approximately 4.5% per °C. Temperature also affected trophic interactions through an indirect effect on food-web structure (that is, diversity and number of interactions). Herbivore body size was a major determinant of predator-prey interactions, as interaction strength was positively related to the predator-prey size ratio, with large herbivores mostly escaping predation. There is potential for climate warming to cause a switch from bottom-up to top-down regulation of herbivores. These results are critical to resolving the debate on the regulation of tundra and other terrestrial ecosystems exposed to global change. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1038/nclimate2168 },
    KEYWORDS = { arctic environment; body size; ecosystem function; ecosystem structure; herbivore; predator-prey interaction; primary production; terrestrial ecosystem; tundra, Arctic },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84899539048&partnerID=40&md5=00329afed1eeab0fa3efe736e1007f02 },
}

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