ThomasGeiser1997

Référence

Thomas, D.W., Geiser, F. (1997) Periodic arousals in hibernating mammals: Is evaporative water loss involved? Functional Ecology, 11(5):585-591.

Résumé

1. Using existing data on the rate of cutaneous and pulmonary evaporative water loss (EWL) for hibernating Little Brown Bats (Myotis lucifugus) and on the duration of torpor bouts, body temperature (T(b)) and oxygen uptake (Vo2) of Golden-mantled Ground Squirrels (Spermophilus saturatus), the rate of EWL was modelled for ground squirrels hibernating at ambient temperatures (T(a)) of -2, 2, 4 8 °C. 2. Total EWL showed a curvilinear response to T(a), being lowest at 2 °C and increasing with both increasing and decreasing T(a). EWL at -2 °C was about equal to that at 4 °C. The duration of torpor bouts showed the same curvilinear response to T(a) and torpor bout duration at -2 °C was similar to that at 4 °C (8.5 vs 8.3 days, respectively). 3. At T(a) ? 2 °C, where T(b) of torpid S. saturatus is not metabolically defended, torpor bout duration is significantly related to T(b), Vo2 and EWL, with the three variables having similar r2 values. 4. Using the regression equations generated at T(a) ? 2 °C to predict torpor bout durations at -2 °C, where T(b) is metabolically defended, shows that the three variables do not have equivalent predictive abilities. T(b) and Vo2 predicted torpor bout durations of 15.2 and -40.4 days, respectively, compared with observed duration of 8.5 days at -2 °C. EWL predicted torpor bout durations of 8.4 days or only 0.1 days less than that observed at -2 °C. 5. The relation between torpor bout duration and total EWL was insensitive to major variations in cutaneous EWL. Over T(a) ranging from -2 °C to 8 °C, a stepwise multiple regression including T(b), Vo2 and EWL as independent variables identified EWL as the only variable significantly correlated with torpor bout duration. 6. Our analyses suggest that torpor duration may be influenced by EWL, indicating that animals may need to obtain free water when they arouse. An analysis of the structural and temperature characteristics of ground squirrel hibernacula suggests that they may function as a biological condensing lower. Throughout winter, water should evaporate from the warm lower levels and condense in the colder upper regions and so free water may be available to animals when they arouse.

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@ARTICLE { ThomasGeiser1997,
    AUTHOR = { Thomas, D.W. and Geiser, F. },
    TITLE = { Periodic arousals in hibernating mammals: Is evaporative water loss involved? },
    JOURNAL = { Functional Ecology },
    YEAR = { 1997 },
    VOLUME = { 11 },
    PAGES = { 585-591 },
    NUMBER = { 5 },
    NOTE = { 02698463 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 15 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: FECOE Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Thomas, D.W.; Groupe RENE; Department of Biology; University of Sherbrooke Sherbrooke, Que. J1K 2R1, Canada References: Barnes, B.M., Freeze avoidance in a mammal; body temperatures below 0 °C in an Arctic hibernator (1989) Science, 244, pp. 1593-1595; Baumer, J., South, F.E., Ferren, L., Zatzman, M.L., A possible basis for periodic arousals during hibernation: Accumulation of ketone bodies (1971) Life Sciences, 10, pp. 463-471; Davis, W.H., Hibernation: Ecology and physiological ecology (1970) Biology of Bats, 3, pp. 265-300. , ed. W. A. Wimsatt, Academic Press, New York; Dawson, T.J., Hulbert, A.J., Standard metabolism, body temperature, and surface areas of Australian marsupials (1970) American Journal of Physiology, 218, pp. 1233-1238; Fisher, K.C., Manery, J.F., Water and electrolyte metabolism in heterotherms (1967) Mammalian Hibernation, 3, pp. 235-279. , eds K. C. Fisher, A. R. Dawe, C. P. Lyman, E. Scho?nbaumn \& F. E. South, Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh; Fowler, P.A., Racey, P.A., Daily and seasonal cycles of body temperature and aspects of heterothermy in the hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus (1990) Journal of Comparative Physiology (B), 160, pp. 299-307; French, A.R., Effects of temperature on the duration of arousal episodes during hibernation (1982) Journal of Applied Physiology, 52, pp. 216-220; Galster, W.A., Morrison, P., Cyclic changes in carbohydrate concentrations during hibernation in the arctic ground squirrel (1972) American Journal of Physiology, 218, pp. 1228-1232; Geiser, F., Kenagy, G.J., Polyunsaturated lipid diet lengthens torpor and reduces body temperature in a hibernator (1987) American Journal of Physiology, 252, pp. R897-R901; Geiser, F., Kenagy, G.J., Torpor duration in relation to temperature and metabolism in hibernating ground squirrels (1988) Physiological Zoology, 61, pp. 442-449; Geiser, F., Hiebert, S., Kenagy, G.J., Torpor bout duration during the hibernation season of two sciurid rodents. Interrelations with temperature and metabolism (1990) Physiological Zoology, 63, pp. 489-503; Hammel, H.T., Dawson, T.J., Adams, R.M., Anderson, H.T., Total calorimetric measurements on Citellus lateralis in hibernation (1968) Physiological Zoology, 41, pp. 341-357; Heller, H.C., Hammel, H.T., CNS control of body temperature during hibernation (1972) Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology, 41 A, pp. 349-359; Kayser, C., L'hibernation des mammife?res (1953) Annales de Biologie, 29, pp. 109-150; Lyman, C.P., Willis, J.S., Malan, A., Wang, L.C.H., (1982) Hibernation and Torpor in Mammals and Birds, , Academic Press, New York; McNab, B.K., (1974) The Behavior of Temperate Cave Bats in a Subtropical Environment Ecology, 55, pp. 943-958; Moy, R.M., Renal function in the hibernating ground squirrel, Spermophilus columbianus (1971) American Journal of Physiology, 220, pp. 747-753; Moy, R.M., Lesser, R.W., Pfeiffer, E.W., Urine concentrating ability of arousing and normothermic ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus) (1972) Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology, 41 A, pp. 327-337. },
    ABSTRACT = { 1. Using existing data on the rate of cutaneous and pulmonary evaporative water loss (EWL) for hibernating Little Brown Bats (Myotis lucifugus) and on the duration of torpor bouts, body temperature (T(b)) and oxygen uptake (Vo2) of Golden-mantled Ground Squirrels (Spermophilus saturatus), the rate of EWL was modelled for ground squirrels hibernating at ambient temperatures (T(a)) of -2, 2, 4 8 °C. 2. Total EWL showed a curvilinear response to T(a), being lowest at 2 °C and increasing with both increasing and decreasing T(a). EWL at -2 °C was about equal to that at 4 °C. The duration of torpor bouts showed the same curvilinear response to T(a) and torpor bout duration at -2 °C was similar to that at 4 °C (8.5 vs 8.3 days, respectively). 3. At T(a) ? 2 °C, where T(b) of torpid S. saturatus is not metabolically defended, torpor bout duration is significantly related to T(b), Vo2 and EWL, with the three variables having similar r2 values. 4. Using the regression equations generated at T(a) ? 2 °C to predict torpor bout durations at -2 °C, where T(b) is metabolically defended, shows that the three variables do not have equivalent predictive abilities. T(b) and Vo2 predicted torpor bout durations of 15.2 and -40.4 days, respectively, compared with observed duration of 8.5 days at -2 °C. EWL predicted torpor bout durations of 8.4 days or only 0.1 days less than that observed at -2 °C. 5. The relation between torpor bout duration and total EWL was insensitive to major variations in cutaneous EWL. Over T(a) ranging from -2 °C to 8 °C, a stepwise multiple regression including T(b), Vo2 and EWL as independent variables identified EWL as the only variable significantly correlated with torpor bout duration. 6. Our analyses suggest that torpor duration may be influenced by EWL, indicating that animals may need to obtain free water when they arouse. An analysis of the structural and temperature characteristics of ground squirrel hibernacula suggests that they may function as a biological condensing lower. Throughout winter, water should evaporate from the warm lower levels and condense in the colder upper regions and so free water may be available to animals when they arouse. },
    KEYWORDS = { Bat Evaporative water loss Hibernation Rodent Torpor bout duration arousal hibernation mammal water loss Animalia Mammalia Myotis lucifugus Rodentia Sciuridae Spermophilus lateralis Spermophilus saturatus },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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