DesplandHumireMartin2012

Reference

Despland, E., Humire, R., Martin, S. (2012) Species richness and phenology of butterflies along an altitude gradient in the desert of Northern Chile. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 44(4):423-431. (Scopus )

Abstract

We use butterfly data from an arid subtropical elevation gradient to test temperate-zone hypotheses regarding altitude effects on diversity and phenology. Specifically, species richness is predicted to peak at mid-altitude on arid-zone mountains with opposite temperature and precipitation gradients, and phenological windows of activity are expected to be more synchronized, shorter, and later with altitude.A transect on the Pacific slope of the Andes in northern Chile (23°S, 2400-5000 m a.s.l.) was observed fortnightly between October 2008 and June 2009. The 13 species observed showed high altitudinal and temporal turnover, dividing the transect into three entomofaunal zones that follow well-documented altitudinal vegetation belts. Species richness peaked at mid-altitude in the Puna shrub belt, the zone with highest plant productivity and diversity, supporting McCain's water-temperature hypothesis. Community-level predictions about phenology were not met: instead, the flight period began earlier at high altitude, presumably due to earlier water availability, and neither synchronization nor duration of flight periods varied consistently with altitude. At the species level, relationships between butterfly phenology and altitude were variable, suggesting no direct effect of altitude but rather complex effects of changing environmental conditions that vary according to individual species' ecological requirements, host plant use, and lifecycle.

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@ARTICLE { DesplandHumireMartin2012,
    AUTHOR = { Despland, E. and Humire, R. and Martin, S. },
    TITLE = { Species richness and phenology of butterflies along an altitude gradient in the desert of Northern Chile },
    JOURNAL = { Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    VOLUME = { 44 },
    PAGES = { 423-431 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    ABSTRACT = { We use butterfly data from an arid subtropical elevation gradient to test temperate-zone hypotheses regarding altitude effects on diversity and phenology. Specifically, species richness is predicted to peak at mid-altitude on arid-zone mountains with opposite temperature and precipitation gradients, and phenological windows of activity are expected to be more synchronized, shorter, and later with altitude.A transect on the Pacific slope of the Andes in northern Chile (23°S, 2400-5000 m a.s.l.) was observed fortnightly between October 2008 and June 2009. The 13 species observed showed high altitudinal and temporal turnover, dividing the transect into three entomofaunal zones that follow well-documented altitudinal vegetation belts. Species richness peaked at mid-altitude in the Puna shrub belt, the zone with highest plant productivity and diversity, supporting McCain's water-temperature hypothesis. Community-level predictions about phenology were not met: instead, the flight period began earlier at high altitude, presumably due to earlier water availability, and neither synchronization nor duration of flight periods varied consistently with altitude. At the species level, relationships between butterfly phenology and altitude were variable, suggesting no direct effect of altitude but rather complex effects of changing environmental conditions that vary according to individual species' ecological requirements, host plant use, and lifecycle. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 20 February 2013 Source: Scopus CODEN: AAARF doi: 10.1657/1938-4246-44.4.423 },
    ISSN = { 15230430 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { altitude, butterfly, desert, environmental conditions, phenology, precipitation (climatology), species diversity, species richness, temperature effect, water temperature, Chile },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2013.02.20 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84870193630&partnerID=40&md5=4ea36b018fbcb65374ef14bf1c24a5a8 },
}

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