Bauce1989

Référence

Bauce, E. (1989) Sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marsh., decline associated with past disturbances. Thèse de doctorat, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Résumé

The significance of past disturbances in the etiology of sugar maple decline in a 85-year-old northern hardwood stand was determined. A system for classifying the condition of sugar maple crowns was tested for its relationships with tree physiological status evaluated by cambial electrical resistance (CER) and root starch content. Crown condition classes were related to CER. Root starch content did not discriminate between the classes of crown condition. A sampling protocol that optimizes precision and cost of a survey to evaluate the incidence of sugar maple decline is presented. Sugar maples with crown dieback had lower feeder root biomass, and fewer rootlet tips than healthy trees. However, rootlet mortality did not differ significantly between dieback classes. Damage caused by rhizophagous insects was significantly greater on trees in advanced stages of dieback than on trees with relatively healthy crowns. The wood boring insects Xiphydria maculata Say (Hymenoptera: Xiphydriidae), Strangalepta abreviata German (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), Xyloterinus politus (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), one species of Melandryidae, Ptilinus ruficornis (Say) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), and Ctenophora apicata Osten Sachen (Diptera: Tipulidae), were more strongly attracted to declining trees than to healthy trees. C. apicata may also be rhizophagous. The damage caused by sugar maple borer, Glycobius speciosus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), was greater on declining trees than on stressed but otherwise healthy trees. Sugar maple borer was the most important of the insects investigated. Detailed tree growth analysis indicated that, since the early stages of stand development, dominant sugar maples that are currently declining showed slower growth than healthy trees. A steady growth decline of all dominant trees during the last thirty years was significantly correlated with adverse climatic conditions. However, high levels of stand density predispose sugar maple trees to adverse effects of climatic and biotic stresses. Sugar maple decline is reversible during early stages before secondary insects and fungi invade stressed trees. In some cases, sugar maple decline is part of a natural stand density regulatory process that may be prevented by silvicultural intervention.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@PHDTHESIS { Bauce1989,
    AUTHOR = { Bauce, E. },
    TITLE = { Sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marsh., decline associated with past disturbances },
    SCHOOL = { State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry },
    YEAR = { 1989 },
    TYPE = { Ph.D. },
    ABSTRACT = { The significance of past disturbances in the etiology of sugar maple decline in a 85-year-old northern hardwood stand was determined. A system for classifying the condition of sugar maple crowns was tested for its relationships with tree physiological status evaluated by cambial electrical resistance (CER) and root starch content. Crown condition classes were related to CER. Root starch content did not discriminate between the classes of crown condition. A sampling protocol that optimizes precision and cost of a survey to evaluate the incidence of sugar maple decline is presented. Sugar maples with crown dieback had lower feeder root biomass, and fewer rootlet tips than healthy trees. However, rootlet mortality did not differ significantly between dieback classes. Damage caused by rhizophagous insects was significantly greater on trees in advanced stages of dieback than on trees with relatively healthy crowns. The wood boring insects Xiphydria maculata Say (Hymenoptera: Xiphydriidae), Strangalepta abreviata German (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), Xyloterinus politus (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), one species of Melandryidae, Ptilinus ruficornis (Say) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), and Ctenophora apicata Osten Sachen (Diptera: Tipulidae), were more strongly attracted to declining trees than to healthy trees. C. apicata may also be rhizophagous. The damage caused by sugar maple borer, Glycobius speciosus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), was greater on declining trees than on stressed but otherwise healthy trees. Sugar maple borer was the most important of the insects investigated. Detailed tree growth analysis indicated that, since the early stages of stand development, dominant sugar maples that are currently declining showed slower growth than healthy trees. A steady growth decline of all dominant trees during the last thirty years was significantly correlated with adverse climatic conditions. However, high levels of stand density predispose sugar maple trees to adverse effects of climatic and biotic stresses. Sugar maple decline is reversible during early stages before secondary insects and fungi invade stressed trees. In some cases, sugar maple decline is part of a natural stand density regulatory process that may be prevented by silvicultural intervention. },
    KEYWORDS = { Entomology Environmental science Forestry },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ************* Colloque **************************** **********************************************************

1 au 3 mai 2019
UQAC

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** ********************************************************** >>whiteboxnoborder padding-top=5px<< Formations (:table border=0 :) (:cellnr valign=top:)• (:cell:)Introduction aux bases de données relationnelles
4 & 5 décembre à l'UQAM (:tableend:) >><< ********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Carapace ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Budworm ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Colibri **************************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ********** Pub 6 - Au coeur de l'arbre *********** **********************************************************

...Une exposition
virtuelle sur l'arbre!

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction .

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...