HuangTardifDennelerEtAl2008

Référence

Huang, J.G., Tardif, J.C., Denneler, B., Bergeron, Y. and Berninger, F. (2008) Tree-ring evidence extends the historic northern range limit of severe defoliation by insects in the aspen stands of western Quebec, Canada. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 38(9):2535-2544.

Résumé

A dendrochronological reconstruction of insect outbreaks was conducted along a latitudinal gradient from 46 degrees N to 54 degrees N in the boreal forest of western Quebec, Canada. Tree-ring chronologies of the host species, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), were constructed to identify periods of severe defoliation and comparisons were made with tree-ring chronologies of nonhost species. In addition, the frequency of white and narrow rings was used to further confirm the occurrence of insect outbreaks at these latitudes. Some major outbreaks occurred in relatively close synchrony at the regional scale, but the initiation year, intensity, and extent of the outbreaks varied spatially. For example, the 1950s outbreaks were observed from 1951 to 1952 at 46 degrees N, from 1953 to 1954 at 47 degrees N, and from 1954 to 1956 at 48 degrees N. Other major outbreaks like the 1964 and 1980 outbreaks were fairly well synchronized at northern latitudes. The observed outbreaks in trembling aspen stands at 54 degrees N also provided clear evidence that severe insect defoliation occurs much further north than the currently reported range limit, that is, between 49 degrees N and 51 degrees N, of the most important trembling aspen defoliator, the forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hubner). Our study demonstrated that careful identification of white rings in host species can provide valid information allowing the expansion of the forestry insect inventory database both at temporal and spatial scales.

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@ARTICLE { HuangTardifDennelerEtAl2008,
    AUTHOR = { Huang, J.G. and Tardif, J.C. and Denneler, B. and Bergeron, Y. and Berninger, F. },
    TITLE = { Tree-ring evidence extends the historic northern range limit of severe defoliation by insects in the aspen stands of western Quebec, Canada },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Forest Research },
    YEAR = { 2008 },
    VOLUME = { 38 },
    PAGES = { 2535-2544 },
    NUMBER = { 9 },
    MONTH = { sep },
    AF = { Huang, Jian-GuoEOLEOLTardif, JacquesEOLEOLDenneler, BernhardEOLEOLBergeron, YvesEOLEOLBerninger, Frank },
    DI = { 10.1139/X08-080 },
    PG = { 10 },
    SN = { 0045-5067 },
    UT = { ISI:000259879600019 },
    ABSTRACT = { A dendrochronological reconstruction of insect outbreaks was conducted along a latitudinal gradient from 46 degrees N to 54 degrees N in the boreal forest of western Quebec, Canada. Tree-ring chronologies of the host species, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), were constructed to identify periods of severe defoliation and comparisons were made with tree-ring chronologies of nonhost species. In addition, the frequency of white and narrow rings was used to further confirm the occurrence of insect outbreaks at these latitudes. Some major outbreaks occurred in relatively close synchrony at the regional scale, but the initiation year, intensity, and extent of the outbreaks varied spatially. For example, the 1950s outbreaks were observed from 1951 to 1952 at 46 degrees N, from 1953 to 1954 at 47 degrees N, and from 1954 to 1956 at 48 degrees N. Other major outbreaks like the 1964 and 1980 outbreaks were fairly well synchronized at northern latitudes. The observed outbreaks in trembling aspen stands at 54 degrees N also provided clear evidence that severe insect defoliation occurs much further north than the currently reported range limit, that is, between 49 degrees N and 51 degrees N, of the most important trembling aspen defoliator, the forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hubner). Our study demonstrated that careful identification of white rings in host species can provide valid information allowing the expansion of the forestry insect inventory database both at temporal and spatial scales. },
    KEYWORDS = { FOREST TENT CATERPILLAR; POPULUS-TREMULOIDES; BOREAL FOREST; OUTBREAKS; GROWTH; RECONSTRUCTION; FRAGMENTATION; DYNAMICS; DROUGHT; DIEBACK },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2008.11.07 },
}

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