BerningerLemieuxZhai2008

Référence

Berninger, F., Lemieux, J. and Zhai, L. (2008) Coordination of Different Phenological Events during the Growing Season.

Résumé

In two separate studies we followed the phenological development of black spruce on different microsites and of three congeneric species (Jack pine, white birch and trembling aspen) with different growth patterns on a single site. All studies were done in the northern black spruce belt in northern Quebec (northern boreal forest). We followed several phenological points during the growing season (bud development, shoot extension, onset of the diameter growth, diameter growth, budset, end of diamter growth, maximum foliage growth, end of foliage growth, end of latewood differentiation). We hypothesized that phenological development and growth are internally regulated in trees in a way that: (1) the time that it takes to pass through a certain phenological phase is similar for all trees. (2) trees that start bud development earlier will start also diameter growth earlier (3) that growth of "early trees" will end earlier.These kind of relationships are suggested by the hormonal theory of tree growth and would be useful to understand when trees are vulnerable to different abiotic and biotic events. The different sites had a clear impact on phenology which was linked to the microclimate of the site. Bud- development of the warm site was clearly more rapid on a warmer site, separated from about 100 meters from weter colder sites. However, coordination between sites broke down and clear differences in the early stages of bud development were already less clear at the late stages of bud development. The end of growth was quite similar between the sites. Between species it became evident that different species have similar "phenological timetales" and the onset. Ranks of the species were different for budbreak and the onset of xylem development. Also, birch, the species with an earlier budbreak reached full leaf size later than aspen. In addition the often proclaimed linkage between end of extension growth and onset of latewood formation did not hold for Jack pine. The results show that prudence must be used when assuming that the phenological pattern of tree development has " a single clock" but different vegetative growth phases seem to be governed by different processes and belong to different timetables. Shifts or species differences in budburst are not necessarily good indicators of the timing of maximum foliage biomass and vice versa. To analyse these different patterns of phenology we clearly require more experimental and monitoring data on the different phenological processes in trees.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@INPROCEEDINGS { BerningerLemieuxZhai2008,
    AUTHOR = { Berninger, F. and Lemieux, J. and Zhai, L. },
    TITLE = { Coordination of Different Phenological Events during the Growing Season },
    YEAR = { 2008 },
    NUMBER = { B54C-03 },
    MONTH = { Fall Meeting 2008 },
    ORGANIZATION = { American Geophysical Union },
    ABSTRACT = { In two separate studies we followed the phenological development of black spruce on different microsites and of three congeneric species (Jack pine, white birch and trembling aspen) with different growth patterns on a single site. All studies were done in the northern black spruce belt in northern Quebec (northern boreal forest). We followed several phenological points during the growing season (bud development, shoot extension, onset of the diameter growth, diameter growth, budset, end of diamter growth, maximum foliage growth, end of foliage growth, end of latewood differentiation). We hypothesized that phenological development and growth are internally regulated in trees in a way that: (1) the time that it takes to pass through a certain phenological phase is similar for all trees. (2) trees that start bud development earlier will start also diameter growth earlier (3) that growth of "early trees" will end earlier.These kind of relationships are suggested by the hormonal theory of tree growth and would be useful to understand when trees are vulnerable to different abiotic and biotic events. The different sites had a clear impact on phenology which was linked to the microclimate of the site. Bud- development of the warm site was clearly more rapid on a warmer site, separated from about 100 meters from weter colder sites. However, coordination between sites broke down and clear differences in the early stages of bud development were already less clear at the late stages of bud development. The end of growth was quite similar between the sites. Between species it became evident that different species have similar "phenological timetales" and the onset. Ranks of the species were different for budbreak and the onset of xylem development. Also, birch, the species with an earlier budbreak reached full leaf size later than aspen. In addition the often proclaimed linkage between end of extension growth and onset of latewood formation did not hold for Jack pine. The results show that prudence must be used when assuming that the phenological pattern of tree development has " a single clock" but different vegetative growth phases seem to be governed by different processes and belong to different timetables. Shifts or species differences in budburst are not necessarily good indicators of the timing of maximum foliage biomass and vice versa. To analyse these different patterns of phenology we clearly require more experimental and monitoring data on the different phenological processes in trees. },
    KEYWORDS = { Biosphere/atmosphere interactions, Carbon cycling },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.10.01 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Écoles d'été et formations

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...