MakelaGivnishBerningerEtAl2002

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Makela, A., Givnish, T.J., Berninger, F., Buckley, T.N., Farquhar, G.D. and Hari, P. (2002) Challenges and opportunities of the optimality approach in plant ecology. Silva Fennica, 36(3):605-614.

Résumé

A meeting was held in Hyytia?la?, Finland 10-12 April 2000 to assess critically the current challenges and limitations of the optimality approach in plant ecophysiology and botany. This article summarises the general discussions and views of the participants on the use of optimisation models as tools in plant ecophysiological research. A general framework of the evolutionary optimisation problem is sketched with a review of applications, typically involved with balanced regulation between parallel processes. The usefulness and limitations of the approach are discussed in terms of published examples, with special reference to model testing. We conclude that, regardless of inevitable problems of model formulation, wider application of the optimality approach could provide a step forward in plant ecophysiology. A major role of evolutionary theory in this process is simply the formulation of testable hypotheses, the evaluation of which can lead to important advances in our ecophysiological understanding and predictive ability.

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@ARTICLE { MakelaGivnishBerningerEtAl2002,
    AUTHOR = { Makela, A. and Givnish, T.J. and Berninger, F. and Buckley, T.N. and Farquhar, G.D. and Hari, P. },
    TITLE = { Challenges and opportunities of the optimality approach in plant ecology },
    JOURNAL = { Silva Fennica },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 36 },
    PAGES = { 605-614 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { 00375330 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 5 Export Date: 24 April 2007 Source: Scopus Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Ma?kela?, A.; University of Helsinki; Dept. of Forest Ecology; P.O. Box 27 FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland; email: annikki.makela@helsinki.fi References: Baatz, M., Wagner, G.P., Adaptive inertia caused by hidden pleiotropic effects (1997) Theor. Popul. Biol., 51, pp. 49-66; Bar-Yam, Y., (1997) Dynamics of Complex Systems, , Perseus books. Reading, MA, USA. 848 p; Cheverud, J.M., The evolution of genetic correlation and developmental constraints (1988) Population Genetics and Evolution, pp. 94-101. , de Jong, G.D. (ed.). Springer Verlag; Cowan, I.R., Stomatal behaviour and environment (1977) Adv. Bot. Res., 4, pp. 117-228; Farquhar, G.D., Stomatal function in relation to leaf metabolism and environment (1977) Soc. Exp. Biol. Symp., 31, pp. 471-505. , Jennings, D.H. (ed); Darwin, C., (1872) The Origin of Species, , John Murray. 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    ABSTRACT = { A meeting was held in Hyytia?la?, Finland 10-12 April 2000 to assess critically the current challenges and limitations of the optimality approach in plant ecophysiology and botany. This article summarises the general discussions and views of the participants on the use of optimisation models as tools in plant ecophysiological research. A general framework of the evolutionary optimisation problem is sketched with a review of applications, typically involved with balanced regulation between parallel processes. The usefulness and limitations of the approach are discussed in terms of published examples, with special reference to model testing. We conclude that, regardless of inevitable problems of model formulation, wider application of the optimality approach could provide a step forward in plant ecophysiology. A major role of evolutionary theory in this process is simply the formulation of testable hypotheses, the evaluation of which can lead to important advances in our ecophysiological understanding and predictive ability. },
    KEYWORDS = { Acclimation Adaptation Evaluation Evolution Hypotheses Models Optimisation Ecology Engineering research Optimization Ecophysiology Plants (botany) botany ecophysiology model optimization plant },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.04 },
}

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