BakryLamhamediCaronEtAl2012

Reference

Bakry, M., Lamhamedi, M.S., Caron, J., Margolis, H.A., El Abidine, A.Z., Bellaka, M., Stowe, D.C. (2012) Are composts from shredded leafy branches of fast-growing forest species suitable as nursery growing media in arid regions? New Forests, 43(3):267-286. (Scopus )

Abstract

The morpho-physiological quality of seedlings is negatively affected by the wide scale use of forest soils as substrates in developing countries. With the objective of finding long-term sustainable supply of growing media, compost was produced from shredded branches of three fast growing species (Acacia cyanophylla (AA), Acacia cyclops (AS) and Eucalyptus gomphocephala (EG). The composting process covered three different periods over the course of a year. Pile temperatures were monitored daily and the composts were routinely sampled and analyzed for 19 chemical variables. Although composting is feasible year-round in arid climates, compost produced in the humid cool conditions of autumn, winter and early spring reaches the maturation phase more quickly than compost produced under hot, dry summer conditions. It also requires less turning and water. The evolution of the composting process and quality of the final product can be assessed using three chemical variables (C/N, pH, EC). Seed germination rates in the three types of compost were similar to that in a peat:vermiculite substrate and vigorous high quality seedlings were produced in the two acacia composts. However, compost-grown seedlings had significantly smaller shoots and root systems than those produced in peat substrate. Principal components analyses showed that the quality of a compost-based substrate is reproducible and that its final chemical composition can be predicted from its raw organic materials. The EG composts had higher pH than the acacia composts, whereas the AA and EG composts were higher in mineral salts than the AS. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

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@ARTICLE { BakryLamhamediCaronEtAl2012,
    AUTHOR = { Bakry, M. and Lamhamedi, M.S. and Caron, J. and Margolis, H.A. and El Abidine, A.Z. and Bellaka, M. and Stowe, D.C. },
    TITLE = { Are composts from shredded leafy branches of fast-growing forest species suitable as nursery growing media in arid regions? },
    JOURNAL = { New Forests },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    VOLUME = { 43 },
    PAGES = { 267-286 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { The morpho-physiological quality of seedlings is negatively affected by the wide scale use of forest soils as substrates in developing countries. With the objective of finding long-term sustainable supply of growing media, compost was produced from shredded branches of three fast growing species (Acacia cyanophylla (AA), Acacia cyclops (AS) and Eucalyptus gomphocephala (EG). The composting process covered three different periods over the course of a year. Pile temperatures were monitored daily and the composts were routinely sampled and analyzed for 19 chemical variables. Although composting is feasible year-round in arid climates, compost produced in the humid cool conditions of autumn, winter and early spring reaches the maturation phase more quickly than compost produced under hot, dry summer conditions. It also requires less turning and water. The evolution of the composting process and quality of the final product can be assessed using three chemical variables (C/N, pH, EC). Seed germination rates in the three types of compost were similar to that in a peat:vermiculite substrate and vigorous high quality seedlings were produced in the two acacia composts. However, compost-grown seedlings had significantly smaller shoots and root systems than those produced in peat substrate. Principal components analyses showed that the quality of a compost-based substrate is reproducible and that its final chemical composition can be predicted from its raw organic materials. The EG composts had higher pH than the acacia composts, whereas the AA and EG composts were higher in mineral salts than the AS. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 15 May 2012 Source: Scopus CODEN: NEFOE doi: 10.1007/s11056-011-9280-x },
    ISSN = { 01694286 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Arid zones, Compost, Forest biomass, Nursery substrates },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2012.05.15 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859952188&partnerID=40&md5=2135a90d384e82ad82509f0a4d4b1689 },
}

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