WangCiaisPiaoEtAl2010

Reference

Wang, T., Ciais, P., Piao, S., Ottle, C., Brender, P., Maignan, F., Arain, A., Gianelle, D., Gu, L., Lafleur, P., Laurila, T., Margolis, H.A., Montagnani, L., Moors, E., Nobuko, S., Vesala, T., Wohlfahrt, G., Reichstein, M., Migliavacca, M., Ammann, C., Aubinet, M., Barr, A., Bernacchi, C., Bernhofer, C., Black, T., Davis, K., Dellwik, E., Dragoni, D., Don, A., Flanagan, L., Foken, T., Granier, A., Hadley, J., Hirata, R., Hollinger, D., Kato, T., Kutsch, W., Marek, M., Matamala, R., Matteucci, G., Meyers, T., Monson, R., Munger, J., Oechel, W., Paw U, K.T., Rebmann, C., Tuba, Z., Valentini, R., Varlagin, A., Verma, S. (2010) Controls on winter ecosystem respiration at mid-and high-latitudes. Biogeosciences, 7(5):6997-7027. (Scopus )

Abstract

Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. The factors influencing the spatial and temporal pattern of winter respiration (RECO) of northern ecosystems are poorly understood. For this reason, we analyzed eddy covariance flux data sets from 57 ecosystem sites ranging from ~35° N to ~70° N. Deciduous forests carry the highest winter RECO ratios (9.7Ä�€"10.5 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1), when winter is defined as the period during which air temperature remained below 0 °C. By contrast, wetland ecosystems had the lowest winter RECO (2.1Ä�€"2.3 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1). Evergreen needle-leaved forests, grasslands and croplands were characterized by intermediate winter RECO values of 7.4Ä�€"7.9 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1, 5.8Ä�€"6.0 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1, and 5.2Ä�€"5.3 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1, respectively. Cross site analysis showed that winter air or soil temperature, and the seasonal amplitude of the leaf area index inferred from satellite observation, which is a proxy for the amount of litter available for RECO in the subsequent winter, are the two main factors determining spatial pattern of daily mean winter RECO. Together, these two factors can explain 71% (<i>T</i>air, "LAI) or 69% (<i>T</i>soil, "LAI) of the spatial variance of winter RECO across the 57 sites. The spatial temperature sensitivity of daily winter RECO was determined empirically by fitting an Arrhenius relationship to the data. The activation energy parameter of this relationship was found to decrease at increasing soil temperature at a rate of 83.1 KJ ° C-1 (<i>r</i> Combining double low line Ä�Ì‚'0.32, <i>p</i> < 0.05), which implies a possible dampening of the increase in winter RECO due to global warming. The interannual variability of winter RECO is better explained by soil temperature than by air temperature, likely due to the insulating effects of snow cover. The increase in winter RECO with a 1 °C warming based calculated from the spatial analysis was almost that double that calculated from the temporal analysis. Thus, models that calculate the effects of warming on RECO based only on spatial analyses could be over-estimating the impact. © Author(s) 2010.

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@ARTICLE { WangCiaisPiaoEtAl2010,
    AUTHOR = { Wang, T. and Ciais, P. and Piao, S. and Ottle, C. and Brender, P. and Maignan, F. and Arain, A. and Gianelle, D. and Gu, L. and Lafleur, P. and Laurila, T. and Margolis, H.A. and Montagnani, L. and Moors, E. and Nobuko, S. and Vesala, T. and Wohlfahrt, G. and Reichstein, M. and Migliavacca, M. and Ammann, C. and Aubinet, M. and Barr, A. and Bernacchi, C. and Bernhofer, C. and Black, T. and Davis, K. and Dellwik, E. and Dragoni, D. and Don, A. and Flanagan, L. and Foken, T. and Granier, A. and Hadley, J. and Hirata, R. and Hollinger, D. and Kato, T. and Kutsch, W. and Marek, M. and Matamala, R. and Matteucci, G. and Meyers, T. and Monson, R. and Munger, J. and Oechel, W. and Paw U, K.T. and Rebmann, C. and Tuba, Z. and Valentini, R. and Varlagin, A. and Verma, S. },
    TITLE = { Controls on winter ecosystem respiration at mid-and high-latitudes },
    JOURNAL = { Biogeosciences },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 7 },
    PAGES = { 6997--7027 },
    NUMBER = { 5 },
    ABSTRACT = { Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. The factors influencing the spatial and temporal pattern of winter respiration (RECO) of northern ecosystems are poorly understood. For this reason, we analyzed eddy covariance flux data sets from 57 ecosystem sites ranging from ~35° N to ~70° N. Deciduous forests carry the highest winter RECO ratios (9.7Ä�€"10.5 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1), when winter is defined as the period during which air temperature remained below 0 °C. By contrast, wetland ecosystems had the lowest winter RECO (2.1Ä�€"2.3 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1). Evergreen needle-leaved forests, grasslands and croplands were characterized by intermediate winter RECO values of 7.4Ä�€"7.9 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1, 5.8Ä�€"6.0 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1, and 5.2Ä�€"5.3 g C mÄ�Ì‚'2 dÄ�Ì‚'1, respectively. Cross site analysis showed that winter air or soil temperature, and the seasonal amplitude of the leaf area index inferred from satellite observation, which is a proxy for the amount of litter available for RECO in the subsequent winter, are the two main factors determining spatial pattern of daily mean winter RECO. Together, these two factors can explain 71% (<i>T</i>air, "LAI) or 69% (<i>T</i>soil, "LAI) of the spatial variance of winter RECO across the 57 sites. The spatial temperature sensitivity of daily winter RECO was determined empirically by fitting an Arrhenius relationship to the data. The activation energy parameter of this relationship was found to decrease at increasing soil temperature at a rate of 83.1 KJ ° C-1 (<i>r</i> Combining double low line Ä�Ì‚'0.32, <i>p</i> < 0.05), which implies a possible dampening of the increase in winter RECO due to global warming. The interannual variability of winter RECO is better explained by soil temperature than by air temperature, likely due to the insulating effects of snow cover. The increase in winter RECO with a 1 °C warming based calculated from the spatial analysis was almost that double that calculated from the temporal analysis. Thus, models that calculate the effects of warming on RECO based only on spatial analyses could be over-estimating the impact. © Author(s) 2010. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 27 April 2011 Source: Scopus doi: 10.5194/bgd-7-6997-2010 },
    ISSN = { 18106277 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { air temperature, carbon budget, carbon dioxide, climate change, deciduous forest, eddy covariance, evergreen forest, global warming, leaf area index, snow cover, soil temperature, spatiotemporal analysis, winter },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2011.04.27 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77956831641&partnerID=40&md5=c9b21cd9b655d0be6c0e943cf3704b23 },
}

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