DrobyshevSimardBergeronEtAl2010

Référence

Drobyshev, I., Simard, M., Bergeron, Y., Hofgaard, A. (2010) Does soil organic layer thickness affect climate-growth relationships in the black spruce boreal ecosystem? Ecosystems, 13(4):556-574. (Scopus )

Résumé

The observed long-term decrease in the regional fire activity of Eastern Canada results in excessive accumulation of organic layer on the forest floor of coniferous forests, which may affect climate-growth relationships in canopy trees. To test this hypothesis, we related tree-ring chronologies of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) to soil organic layer (SOL) depth at the stand scale in the lowland forests of Quebec's Clay Belt. Late-winter and early-spring temperatures and temperature at the end of the previous year's growing season were the major monthly level environmental controls of spruce growth. The effect of SOL on climate-growth relationships was moderate and reversed the association between tree growth and summer aridity from a negative to a positive relationship: trees growing on thin organic layers were thus negatively affected by drought, whereas it was the opposite for sites with deep (>20-30 cm) organic layers. This indicates the development of wetter conditions on sites with thicker SOL. Deep SOL were also associated with an increased frequency of negative growth anomalies (pointer years) in tree-ring chronologies. Our results emphasize the presence of nonlinear growth responses to SOL accumulation, suggesting 20-30 cm as a provisional threshold with respect to the effects of SOL on the climate-growth relationship. Given the current climatic conditions characterized by generally low-fire activity and a trend toward accumulation of SOL, the importance of SOL effects in the black spruce ecosystem is expected to increase in the future. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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@ARTICLE { DrobyshevSimardBergeronEtAl2010,
    AUTHOR = { Drobyshev, I. and Simard, M. and Bergeron, Y. and Hofgaard, A. },
    TITLE = { Does soil organic layer thickness affect climate-growth relationships in the black spruce boreal ecosystem? },
    JOURNAL = { Ecosystems },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 13 },
    PAGES = { 556-574 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    ABSTRACT = { The observed long-term decrease in the regional fire activity of Eastern Canada results in excessive accumulation of organic layer on the forest floor of coniferous forests, which may affect climate-growth relationships in canopy trees. To test this hypothesis, we related tree-ring chronologies of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) to soil organic layer (SOL) depth at the stand scale in the lowland forests of Quebec's Clay Belt. Late-winter and early-spring temperatures and temperature at the end of the previous year's growing season were the major monthly level environmental controls of spruce growth. The effect of SOL on climate-growth relationships was moderate and reversed the association between tree growth and summer aridity from a negative to a positive relationship: trees growing on thin organic layers were thus negatively affected by drought, whereas it was the opposite for sites with deep (>20-30 cm) organic layers. This indicates the development of wetter conditions on sites with thicker SOL. Deep SOL were also associated with an increased frequency of negative growth anomalies (pointer years) in tree-ring chronologies. Our results emphasize the presence of nonlinear growth responses to SOL accumulation, suggesting 20-30 cm as a provisional threshold with respect to the effects of SOL on the climate-growth relationship. Given the current climatic conditions characterized by generally low-fire activity and a trend toward accumulation of SOL, the importance of SOL effects in the black spruce ecosystem is expected to increase in the future. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 23 June 2010 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECOSF doi: 10.1007/s10021-010-9340-7 },
    ISSN = { 14329840 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Climate change, Dendroecology, Paludification, Soil conditions, Succession },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.06.23 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953535144&partnerID=40&md5=8c74fc1c52a634e93392643d90383d90 },
}

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