LaforestLapointeArrieta2017

Référence

Laforest-Lapointe, I., Arrieta, M.-C. (2017) Patterns of early-life gut microbial colonization during human immune development: An ecological perspective. Frontiers in Immunology, 8(JUL). (Scopus )

Résumé

Alterations in gut microbial colonization during early life have been reported in infants that later developed asthma, allergies, type 1 diabetes, as well as in inflammatory bowel disease patients, previous to disease flares. Mechanistic studies in animal models have established that microbial alterations influence disease pathogenesis via changes in immune system maturation. Strong evidence points to the presence of a window of opportunity in early life, during which changes in gut microbial colonization can result in immune dysregulation that predisposes susceptible hosts to disease. Although the ecological patterns of microbial succession in the first year of life have been partly defined in specific human cohorts, the taxonomic and functional features, and diversity thresholds that characterize these microbial alterations are, for the most part, unknown. In this review, we summarize the most important links between the temporal mosaics of gut microbial colonization and the age-dependent immune functions that rely on them. We also highlight the importance of applying ecology theory to design studies that explore the interactions between this complex ecosystem and the host immune system. Focusing research efforts on understanding the importance of temporally structured patterns of diversity, keystone groups, and inter-kingdom microbial interactions for ecosystem functions has great potential to enable the development of biologically sound interventions aimed at maintaining and/or improving immune system development and preventing disease. © 2017 Laforest-Lapointe and Arrieta.

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@ARTICLE { LaforestLapointeArrieta2017,
    AUTHOR = { Laforest-Lapointe, I. and Arrieta, M.-C. },
    JOURNAL = { Frontiers in Immunology },
    TITLE = { Patterns of early-life gut microbial colonization during human immune development: An ecological perspective },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    NOTE = { cited By 47 },
    NUMBER = { JUL },
    VOLUME = { 8 },
    ABSTRACT = { Alterations in gut microbial colonization during early life have been reported in infants that later developed asthma, allergies, type 1 diabetes, as well as in inflammatory bowel disease patients, previous to disease flares. Mechanistic studies in animal models have established that microbial alterations influence disease pathogenesis via changes in immune system maturation. Strong evidence points to the presence of a window of opportunity in early life, during which changes in gut microbial colonization can result in immune dysregulation that predisposes susceptible hosts to disease. Although the ecological patterns of microbial succession in the first year of life have been partly defined in specific human cohorts, the taxonomic and functional features, and diversity thresholds that characterize these microbial alterations are, for the most part, unknown. In this review, we summarize the most important links between the temporal mosaics of gut microbial colonization and the age-dependent immune functions that rely on them. We also highlight the importance of applying ecology theory to design studies that explore the interactions between this complex ecosystem and the host immune system. Focusing research efforts on understanding the importance of temporally structured patterns of diversity, keystone groups, and inter-kingdom microbial interactions for ecosystem functions has great potential to enable the development of biologically sound interventions aimed at maintaining and/or improving immune system development and preventing disease. © 2017 Laforest-Lapointe and Arrieta. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 788 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Diversity; Early-life events; Immune development; Keystone taxa; Microbial ecology; Microbiome },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Review },
    DOI = { 10.3389/fimmu.2017.00788 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85022175778&doi=10.3389%2ffimmu.2017.00788&partnerID=40&md5=4fb9c8ab1ea1bc32fb914ac8f75dd034 },
}

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