SiroisBeginParent1999

Référence

Sirois, L., Begin, Y., Parent, J. (1999) Female gametophyte and embryo development of black spruce along a shore-hinterland climatic gradient of a recently created reservoir, northern Quebec. Canadian Journal of Botany, 77(1):61-69. (Scopus )

Résumé

The development of female gametophytes and embryos in relation to cumulative growing degree-days was followed to see if the postulated cooling influence of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir (LG2, northern Quebec) slowed the reproductive process of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.). During the 1996 growing season, three to five developing seed cones were harvested 11 times on nine trees distributed along a shore-hinterland gradient of the northern shore of the reservoir. The daily thermal sum (degree-days > 5°C) in the seed cone zone of the same trees was also monitored to describe the female gametophyte and embryo development of this species as a function of heat sum. The 23 developmental stages identified in this study confirm that the female gametophyte and embryo of P. mariana develop according to the same pattern exhibited by other Picea spp. These stages, although unequal in duration, succeeded each other according to a sigmoid function of the temperature sum. Direct temperature measurements taken 0, 25, and 100 m from the shore of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir suggest the interior trees experienced 107 more degree-days > 5°C than the shoreline trees during seed maturation. Although gametophyte development of the shoreline trees was delayed early in the growing season (Kruskall-Wallis, p = 0.05), this delay does not persist afterward. Despite the net cooling effect of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir, all studied trees achieved embryo maturation in 1996. During this growing season, the warmest since 1977, it took embryos 800-940 degree-days to mature. The shoreline trees reached this temperature threshold later than interior trees. It is suggested that the cooling effect of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir could contribute to the inhibition of embryo maturation in shoreline trees during growing seasons with less than 800 degree-days.

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@ARTICLE { SiroisBeginParent1999,
    AUTHOR = { Sirois, L. and Begin, Y. and Parent, J. },
    TITLE = { Female gametophyte and embryo development of black spruce along a shore-hinterland climatic gradient of a recently created reservoir, northern Quebec },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Botany },
    YEAR = { 1999 },
    VOLUME = { 77 },
    PAGES = { 61-69 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { The development of female gametophytes and embryos in relation to cumulative growing degree-days was followed to see if the postulated cooling influence of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir (LG2, northern Quebec) slowed the reproductive process of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.). During the 1996 growing season, three to five developing seed cones were harvested 11 times on nine trees distributed along a shore-hinterland gradient of the northern shore of the reservoir. The daily thermal sum (degree-days > 5°C) in the seed cone zone of the same trees was also monitored to describe the female gametophyte and embryo development of this species as a function of heat sum. The 23 developmental stages identified in this study confirm that the female gametophyte and embryo of P. mariana develop according to the same pattern exhibited by other Picea spp. These stages, although unequal in duration, succeeded each other according to a sigmoid function of the temperature sum. Direct temperature measurements taken 0, 25, and 100 m from the shore of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir suggest the interior trees experienced 107 more degree-days > 5°C than the shoreline trees during seed maturation. Although gametophyte development of the shoreline trees was delayed early in the growing season (Kruskall-Wallis, p = 0.05), this delay does not persist afterward. Despite the net cooling effect of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir, all studied trees achieved embryo maturation in 1996. During this growing season, the warmest since 1977, it took embryos 800-940 degree-days to mature. The shoreline trees reached this temperature threshold later than interior trees. It is suggested that the cooling effect of the Robert-Bourassa reservoir could contribute to the inhibition of embryo maturation in shoreline trees during growing seasons with less than 800 degree-days. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 12 Export Date: 10 February 2010 Source: Scopus CODEN: CJBOA },
    ISSN = { 00084026 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Black spruce, Climate change, Cone development, Northern boreal forests, Picea mariana, Seed maturation, canada, embryo development, female, gametophyte, maturation, plant embryogenesis, seed development, temperature, climate, embryonic development, environmental gradient, spruce, Canada, Picea mariana },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.02.10 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033508969&partnerID=40&md5=de00f936e8ad6dbd4063e07ef1162cf4 },
}

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