FugereBradleyVellend2017

Référence

Fugere, M., Bradley, R.L., Vellend, M. (2017) Exotic earthworms dispersion through protected forest areas and their potential impacts on nitrous oxide production. Biological Invasions, 19(3):773-783. (URL )

Résumé

It is generally accepted that human activities are responsible for the dispersal of exotic earthworms in northeastern North America. We know little, however, about the relative effects of concurrent human activities on the structure of these earthworm communities in protected forest areas, nor on their impacts on soil biological activities. Our first objective was to infer the relative importance of recreational fishing and road traffic on the structure of Lumbricidae communities in Mont-Tremblant National Park, the oldest conservation area in the province of Quebec, Canada. Our second objective was to test the relationship between earthworm species abundances and soil properties related to microbial and nitrogen dynamics. We sampled earthworm communities around 61 lakes, which included 23 heavily-fished lakes and 20 non-fished lakes located near roads, as well as 18 non-fished lakes located in remote areas of the park. Our results revealed that fishing and proximity to roads both have a positive effect on the abundance of earthworms, as does the soil pH. Fishing activities had a greater effect than road proximity on the abundance and diversity of earthworm communities, notably on the abundance of the anecic species Lumbricus terrestris. To assess at a finer scale the effects of earthworm community structure on soil microbial and nitrogen dynamics, we collected and analyzed soils from 47 sampling points around two lakes with high earthworm densities. Exploratory redundancy analysis found a negative correlation between epigeic and anecic earthworm species, with the former correlating positively to microbial biomass and the latter correlating positively to nitrification and denitrification. Confirmatory path analysis established a positive indirect effect of Lumbricus terrestris, the preferred fishing bait, on potential soil nitrous oxide emissions. We conclude that the human-mediated dispersion of earthworms in the most pristine ecosystems of Quebec affects ecosystem functioning and thus requires a review of current policies regarding the use of live-bait by fishermen.

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@ARTICLE { FugereBradleyVellend2017,
    AUTHOR = { Fugere, M. and Bradley, R.L. and Vellend, M. },
    TITLE = { Exotic earthworms dispersion through protected forest areas and their potential impacts on nitrous oxide production },
    JOURNAL = { Biological Invasions },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 19 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    PAGES = { 773--783 },
    MONTH = { Mar },
    ISSN = { 1573-1464 },
    ABSTRACT = { It is generally accepted that human activities are responsible for the dispersal of exotic earthworms in northeastern North America. We know little, however, about the relative effects of concurrent human activities on the structure of these earthworm communities in protected forest areas, nor on their impacts on soil biological activities. Our first objective was to infer the relative importance of recreational fishing and road traffic on the structure of Lumbricidae communities in Mont-Tremblant National Park, the oldest conservation area in the province of Quebec, Canada. Our second objective was to test the relationship between earthworm species abundances and soil properties related to microbial and nitrogen dynamics. We sampled earthworm communities around 61 lakes, which included 23 heavily-fished lakes and 20 non-fished lakes located near roads, as well as 18 non-fished lakes located in remote areas of the park. Our results revealed that fishing and proximity to roads both have a positive effect on the abundance of earthworms, as does the soil pH. Fishing activities had a greater effect than road proximity on the abundance and diversity of earthworm communities, notably on the abundance of the anecic species Lumbricus terrestris. To assess at a finer scale the effects of earthworm community structure on soil microbial and nitrogen dynamics, we collected and analyzed soils from 47 sampling points around two lakes with high earthworm densities. Exploratory redundancy analysis found a negative correlation between epigeic and anecic earthworm species, with the former correlating positively to microbial biomass and the latter correlating positively to nitrification and denitrification. Confirmatory path analysis established a positive indirect effect of Lumbricus terrestris, the preferred fishing bait, on potential soil nitrous oxide emissions. We conclude that the human-mediated dispersion of earthworms in the most pristine ecosystems of Quebec affects ecosystem functioning and thus requires a review of current policies regarding the use of live-bait by fishermen. },
    DAY = { 01 },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s10530-016-1331-y },
    OWNER = { Daniel Lesieur },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2018-08-28 },
    URL = { https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1331-y },
}

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