BradyBolnickBarrettEtAl2019

Référence

Brady, S.P., Bolnick, D.I., Barrett, R.D.H., Chapman, L., Crispo, E., Derry, A.M., Eckert, C.G., Fraser, D.J., Fussmann, G.F., Gonzalez, A., Guichard, F., Lamy, T., Lane, J., McAdam, A.G., Newman, A.E.M., Paccard, A., Robertson, B., Rolshausen, G., Schulte, P.M., Simons, A.M., Vellend, M., Hendry, A. (2019) Understanding maladaptation by uniting ecological and evolutionary perspectives. American Naturalist, 194(4):495-515. (URL )

Résumé

Evolutionary biologists have long trained their sights on adaptation, focusing on the power of natural selection to produce relative fitness advantages while often ignoring changes in absolute fitness. Ecologists generally have taken a different tack, focusing on changes in abundance and ranges that reflect absolute fitness while often ignoring relative fitness. Uniting these perspectives, we articulate various causes of relative and absolute maladaptation and review numerous examples of their occurrence. This review indicates that maladaptation is reasonably common from both perspectives, yet often in contrasting ways. That is, maladaptation can appear strong from a relative fitness perspective, yet populations can be growing in abundance. Conversely, resident individuals can appear locally adapted (relative to nonresident individuals) yet be declining in abundance. Understanding and interpreting these disconnects between relative and absolute maladaptation, as well as the cases of agreement, is increasingly critical in the face of accelerating human-mediated environmental change. We therefore present a framework for studying maladaptation, focusing in particular on the relationship between absolute and relative fitness, thereby drawing together evolutionary and ecological perspectives. The unification of these ecological and evolutionary perspectives has the potential to bring together previously disjunct research areas while addressing key conceptual issues and specific practical problems. © 2019 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { BradyBolnickBarrettEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { Brady, S.P. and Bolnick, D.I. and Barrett, R.D.H. and Chapman, L. and Crispo, E. and Derry, A.M. and Eckert, C.G. and Fraser, D.J. and Fussmann, G.F. and Gonzalez, A. and Guichard, F. and Lamy, T. and Lane, J. and McAdam, A.G. and Newman, A.E.M. and Paccard, A. and Robertson, B. and Rolshausen, G. and Schulte, P.M. and Simons, A.M. and Vellend, M. and Hendry, A. },
    TITLE = { Understanding maladaptation by uniting ecological and evolutionary perspectives },
    JOURNAL = { American Naturalist },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 194 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    PAGES = { 495-515 },
    NOTE = { cited By 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Evolutionary biologists have long trained their sights on adaptation, focusing on the power of natural selection to produce relative fitness advantages while often ignoring changes in absolute fitness. Ecologists generally have taken a different tack, focusing on changes in abundance and ranges that reflect absolute fitness while often ignoring relative fitness. Uniting these perspectives, we articulate various causes of relative and absolute maladaptation and review numerous examples of their occurrence. This review indicates that maladaptation is reasonably common from both perspectives, yet often in contrasting ways. That is, maladaptation can appear strong from a relative fitness perspective, yet populations can be growing in abundance. Conversely, resident individuals can appear locally adapted (relative to nonresident individuals) yet be declining in abundance. Understanding and interpreting these disconnects between relative and absolute maladaptation, as well as the cases of agreement, is increasingly critical in the face of accelerating human-mediated environmental change. We therefore present a framework for studying maladaptation, focusing in particular on the relationship between absolute and relative fitness, thereby drawing together evolutionary and ecological perspectives. The unification of these ecological and evolutionary perspectives has the potential to bring together previously disjunct research areas while addressing key conceptual issues and specific practical problems. © 2019 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. },
    AFFILIATION = { Biology Department, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515, United States; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, United States; Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1B1, Canada; Redpath Museum, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 0C4, Canada; Quebec Centre for Biodiversity Science, Stewart Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1B1, Canada; Biology Department, Pace University, New York, NY 10038, United States; Département des sciences biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC H2X 1Y4, Canada; Department of Biology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Biology, Concordia University, Montreal, QC H4B 1R6, Canada; Département de sciences biologiques, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC H2V 2S9, Canada; Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, United States; Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8, Canada; Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada; McGill University Genome Center, Montreal, QC H3A 0G1, Canada; Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12526, United States; Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (SBiK-F), Frankfurt am Main, 60325, Germany; Department of Zoology and Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada; Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; Département de biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Adaptation; Fitness; Global change; Maladaptation },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1086/705020 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www2.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85070576375&doi=10.1086%2f705020&partnerID=40&md5=83f7b362e3bb620b5fd54470555a4947 },
}

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