KharoubaVellendSarfrazEtAl2015

Référence

Kharouba, H.M., Vellend, M., Sarfraz, R.M., Myers, J.H. (2015) The effects of experimental warming on the timing of a plant-insect herbivore interaction. Journal of Animal Ecology, 84(3):785-796. (Scopus )

Résumé

The phenology of many species is shifting in response to climatic changes, and these shifts are occurring at varying rates across species. This can potentially affect species' interactions and individual fitness. However, few studies have experimentally tested the influence of warming on the timing of species interactions. This is an important gap in the literature given the potential for different direct and indirect effects of temperature via phenological change. Our aim was to test the effects of warming on the western tent caterpillar (Malacosoma californicum pluviale). In addition to the direct effects of warming, we considered the two primary indirect effects mediated by warming-driven changes in its host plant, red alder (Alnus rubra): changes in resource availability due to phenological mismatch (i.e. changes in the relative timing of the interaction), and changes in resource quality associated with leaf maturation. We experimentally warmed egg masses and larvae of the western tent caterpillar placed on branches of red alder in the field. Warming advanced the timing of larval but not leaf emergence. This led to varying degrees of phenological mismatch, with larvae emerging as much as 25 days before to 10 days after the emergence of leaves. Even the earliest-emerging larvae, however, had high survival in the absence of leaves for up to 3 weeks, and they were surprisingly resistant to starvation. In addition, although warming created phenological mismatch that initially slowed the development of larvae that emerged before leaf emergence, it accelerated larval development once leaves were available. Therefore, warming had no net effect on our measures of insect performance. Our results demonstrate that the indirect effects of warming, in creating phenological mismatch, are as important to consider as the direct effects on insect performance. Although future climatic warming might influence plants and insects in different ways, some insects may be well adapted to variation in the timing of their interactions. © 2014 British Ecological Society.

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@ARTICLE { KharoubaVellendSarfrazEtAl2015,
    AUTHOR = { Kharouba, H.M. and Vellend, M. and Sarfraz, R.M. and Myers, J.H. },
    TITLE = { The effects of experimental warming on the timing of a plant-insect herbivore interaction },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Animal Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2015 },
    VOLUME = { 84 },
    PAGES = { 785-796 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { The phenology of many species is shifting in response to climatic changes, and these shifts are occurring at varying rates across species. This can potentially affect species' interactions and individual fitness. However, few studies have experimentally tested the influence of warming on the timing of species interactions. This is an important gap in the literature given the potential for different direct and indirect effects of temperature via phenological change. Our aim was to test the effects of warming on the western tent caterpillar (Malacosoma californicum pluviale). In addition to the direct effects of warming, we considered the two primary indirect effects mediated by warming-driven changes in its host plant, red alder (Alnus rubra): changes in resource availability due to phenological mismatch (i.e. changes in the relative timing of the interaction), and changes in resource quality associated with leaf maturation. We experimentally warmed egg masses and larvae of the western tent caterpillar placed on branches of red alder in the field. Warming advanced the timing of larval but not leaf emergence. This led to varying degrees of phenological mismatch, with larvae emerging as much as 25 days before to 10 days after the emergence of leaves. Even the earliest-emerging larvae, however, had high survival in the absence of leaves for up to 3 weeks, and they were surprisingly resistant to starvation. In addition, although warming created phenological mismatch that initially slowed the development of larvae that emerged before leaf emergence, it accelerated larval development once leaves were available. Therefore, warming had no net effect on our measures of insect performance. Our results demonstrate that the indirect effects of warming, in creating phenological mismatch, are as important to consider as the direct effects on insect performance. Although future climatic warming might influence plants and insects in different ways, some insects may be well adapted to variation in the timing of their interactions. © 2014 British Ecological Society. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Budburst; Climate change; Cuttings; Leaf quality; Moth; Phenology; Spring; Synchrony; Temperature; Tree },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/1365-2656.12328 },
    KEYWORDS = { Alnus rubra; Hexapoda; Lepidoptera; Malacosoma californicum },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84928213758&partnerID=40&md5=094d3f773acef67515d58c4543334df2 },
}

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