VellendVerheyenJacquemynEtAl2006

Référence

Vellend, M., Verheyen, K., Jacquemyn, H., Kolb, A., Van Calster, H., Peterken, G., Hermy, M. (2006) Extinction debt of forest plants persists for more than a century following habitat fragmentation. Ecology, 87(3):542-548. (Scopus )

Résumé

Following habitat fragmentation individual habitat patches may lose species over time as they pay off their "extinction debt." Species with relatively low rates of population extinction and colonization ("slow" species) may maintain extinction debts for particularly prolonged periods, but few data are available to test this prediction.We analyzed two unusually detailed data sets on forest plant distributions and land-use history from Lincolnshire, United Kingdom, and Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium, to test for an extinction debt in relation to species-specific extinction and colonization rates. Logistic regression models predicting the presence-absence of 36 plant species were first parameterized using data from Lincolnshire, where forest cover has been relatively low (∼5-8%) for the past 1000 years. Consistent with extinction debt theory, for relatively slow species (but not fast species) these models systematically underpredicted levels of patch occupancy in Vlaams-Brabant, where forest cover was reduced from ∼25% to <10% between 1775 and 1900 (it is presently 6.5%). As a consequence, the ability of the Lincolnshire models to predict patch occupancy in Vlaams-Brabant was worse for slow than for fast species. Thus, more than a century after forest fragmentation reached its current level an extinction debt persists for species with low rates of population turnover. © 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

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@ARTICLE { VellendVerheyenJacquemynEtAl2006,
    AUTHOR = { Vellend, M. and Verheyen, K. and Jacquemyn, H. and Kolb, A. and Van Calster, H. and Peterken, G. and Hermy, M. },
    TITLE = { Extinction debt of forest plants persists for more than a century following habitat fragmentation },
    JOURNAL = { Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2006 },
    VOLUME = { 87 },
    PAGES = { 542-548 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Following habitat fragmentation individual habitat patches may lose species over time as they pay off their "extinction debt." Species with relatively low rates of population extinction and colonization ("slow" species) may maintain extinction debts for particularly prolonged periods, but few data are available to test this prediction.We analyzed two unusually detailed data sets on forest plant distributions and land-use history from Lincolnshire, United Kingdom, and Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium, to test for an extinction debt in relation to species-specific extinction and colonization rates. Logistic regression models predicting the presence-absence of 36 plant species were first parameterized using data from Lincolnshire, where forest cover has been relatively low (∼5-8%) for the past 1000 years. Consistent with extinction debt theory, for relatively slow species (but not fast species) these models systematically underpredicted levels of patch occupancy in Vlaams-Brabant, where forest cover was reduced from ∼25% to <10% between 1775 and 1900 (it is presently 6.5%). As a consequence, the ability of the Lincolnshire models to predict patch occupancy in Vlaams-Brabant was worse for slow than for fast species. Thus, more than a century after forest fragmentation reached its current level an extinction debt persists for species with low rates of population turnover. © 2006 by the Ecological Society of America. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 66 Export Date: 11 March 2011 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECOLA doi: 10.1890/05-1182 },
    ISSN = { 00129658 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Europe, Extinction debt, Forest plants, Habitat fragmentation, Land use history, Metapopulation, Relaxation, Transient dynamics, colonization, data set, habitat fragmentation, habitat loss, land use, population distribution, article, Belgium, biodiversity, ecosystem, environmental protection, geography, physiology, plant physiology, species difference, statistical model, time, tree, United Kingdom, Belgium, Biodiversity, Conservation of Natural Resources, Ecosystem, England, Geography, Logistic Models, Plant Physiology, Species Specificity, Time Factors, Trees, Belgium, Benelux, England, Eurasia, Europe, Flemish Brabant, Lincolnshire, United Kingdom, Western Europe },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2011.03.11 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646160441&partnerID=40&md5=c3ee4ad31a8ac47dc4c799a671abc928 },
}

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