BellLechowiczWaterway2000

Référence

Bell, G., Lechowicz, M.J., Waterway, M.J. (2000) Environmental heterogeneity and species diversity of forest sedges. Journal of Ecology, 88(1):67-87.

Résumé

1. A field experiment was designed to investigate the relationship between environmental heterogeneity and species diversity in a group of sedges (Cyperaceae: Carex) growing in old-growth forest. 2. A measure of environmental quality, as perceived by the sedges, was obtained from the survival of clonal ramets of 11 species of Carex planted at 10-m intervals along each of three 1-km transect lines. 3. The resident assemblage of sedges was censused along the same three transect lines and along a further 24 km of survey lines in the same forest. 4. The general state of a site was represented by the overall survival of the experimental implants at that site. The general environmental variance between sites provided a measure of environmental heterogeneity. This could be partitioned into a specific variance (mean environmental variance of species) and an environmental covariance. The rate of increase of the general and specific variances with distance between sites reflected environmental structure. 5. The three transects differed in scale. The species diversity of the resident Carex assemblage was correlated with general environmental quality both among and within transects. 6. The three transects differed in structure. The number of resident species, relative to the number expected from the number of individuals sampled, was greatest on the most coarse-grained transect (steepest increase in general environmental variance with distance). 7. Within each transect, species diversity increased with general environmental variance because the specific correlation of performance (correlation among species of survival in pair-wise combinations of sites) decreased as the general environmental variance increased. 8. The effect of specific environmental variance was weaker. Overall survival of a species on the transects was not correlated with its abundance in the forest. Neither the transects nor a targeted implant experiment provided evidence for a close relationship between the distribution of species and the state of the environment. 9. As a general explanation of our results, we propose a 'marginal-specialist' model in which the species that dominate the most productive sites also have the broadest ranges, whereas other species are superior in a more restricted range of less productive sites.

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@ARTICLE { BellLechowiczWaterway2000,
    AUTHOR = { Bell, G. and Lechowicz, M.J. and Waterway, M.J. },
    TITLE = { Environmental heterogeneity and species diversity of forest sedges },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2000 },
    VOLUME = { 88 },
    PAGES = { 67-87 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    NOTE = { 00220477 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 25 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: JECOA doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2745.2000.00427.x Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Bell, G.; Biology Department; McGill University; 1205 Ave Dr Penfield Montreal, Que. H3A 1B1, Canada; email: gbell2@maclan.mcgill.ca References: Anderson, J.M., Inter-and intra-habitat relationships between woodland Cryptostigmata species diversity and the diversity of soil and litter microhabitats (1978) Oecologia, 323, pp. 341-348; Auerbach, M., Shmida, A., Spatial scale and the determinants of plant species richness (1987) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 2, pp. 238-242; Bell, G., The ecology and genetics of fitness in Chlamydomonas. V. 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    ABSTRACT = { 1. A field experiment was designed to investigate the relationship between environmental heterogeneity and species diversity in a group of sedges (Cyperaceae: Carex) growing in old-growth forest. 2. A measure of environmental quality, as perceived by the sedges, was obtained from the survival of clonal ramets of 11 species of Carex planted at 10-m intervals along each of three 1-km transect lines. 3. The resident assemblage of sedges was censused along the same three transect lines and along a further 24 km of survey lines in the same forest. 4. The general state of a site was represented by the overall survival of the experimental implants at that site. The general environmental variance between sites provided a measure of environmental heterogeneity. This could be partitioned into a specific variance (mean environmental variance of species) and an environmental covariance. The rate of increase of the general and specific variances with distance between sites reflected environmental structure. 5. The three transects differed in scale. The species diversity of the resident Carex assemblage was correlated with general environmental quality both among and within transects. 6. The three transects differed in structure. The number of resident species, relative to the number expected from the number of individuals sampled, was greatest on the most coarse-grained transect (steepest increase in general environmental variance with distance). 7. Within each transect, species diversity increased with general environmental variance because the specific correlation of performance (correlation among species of survival in pair-wise combinations of sites) decreased as the general environmental variance increased. 8. The effect of specific environmental variance was weaker. Overall survival of a species on the transects was not correlated with its abundance in the forest. Neither the transects nor a targeted implant experiment provided evidence for a close relationship between the distribution of species and the state of the environment. 9. As a general explanation of our results, we propose a 'marginal-specialist' model in which the species that dominate the most productive sites also have the broadest ranges, whereas other species are superior in a more restricted range of less productive sites. },
    KEYWORDS = { Abundance Carex Habitat Implant Plasticity Range Stability Transplant forest species diversity environmental conditions heterogeneity old-growth forest sedge species diversity Carex },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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