BellLechowiczWaterway2006

Référence

Bell, G., Lechowicz, M.J., Waterway, M.J. (2006) The comparative evidence relating to functional and neutral interpretations of biological communities. Ecology, 87(6):1378-1386.

Résumé

Neutral and functional theories provide rival interpretations of community patterns involving distribution, abundance, and diversity. One group of patterns describes the overall properties of species or sites, and derives principally from the frequency distribution of abundance among species. According to neutral theory, these patterns are determined by the number of individuals of novel type appearing each generation in the community, whereas functional theory relates them to the distribution of the extent of niches. A second group of patterns describes the spatial attributes of communities, and derives principally from the decay of similarity in species composition with distance. Neutral theory interprets these patterns as consequences of local dispersal alone, whereas the functional interpretation is that more distant sites are likely to be ecologically different. Neutral theory often provides good predictions of community patterns, yet is at variance with a wide range of experimental results involving the manipulation of environments or communities. One explanation for this discrepancy is that spatially explicit models where selection is generally weak, or where selection acts strongly on only a few species at each site, have essentially the same output as neutral models with respect to the distribution of abundance and the decay of similarity. Detecting a non-neutral signal in survey data requires careful spatial or phylogenetic analysis; we emphasize the potential utility of incorporating phylogenetic information in order to detect functional processes that lead to ecological variation among clades. © 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

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@ARTICLE { BellLechowiczWaterway2006,
    AUTHOR = { Bell, G. and Lechowicz, M.J. and Waterway, M.J. },
    TITLE = { The comparative evidence relating to functional and neutral interpretations of biological communities },
    JOURNAL = { Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2006 },
    VOLUME = { 87 },
    PAGES = { 1378-1386 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    NOTE = { 00129658 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 1 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECOLA Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Bell, G.; Redpath Museum; McGill University; 859 Sherbrooke Street West Montreal, Que. H3A 2K6, Canada; email: Graham.bell@mcgill.ca References: Bell, G., The ecology and genetics of fitness in Chlamydomonas. II. 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    ABSTRACT = { Neutral and functional theories provide rival interpretations of community patterns involving distribution, abundance, and diversity. One group of patterns describes the overall properties of species or sites, and derives principally from the frequency distribution of abundance among species. According to neutral theory, these patterns are determined by the number of individuals of novel type appearing each generation in the community, whereas functional theory relates them to the distribution of the extent of niches. A second group of patterns describes the spatial attributes of communities, and derives principally from the decay of similarity in species composition with distance. Neutral theory interprets these patterns as consequences of local dispersal alone, whereas the functional interpretation is that more distant sites are likely to be ecologically different. Neutral theory often provides good predictions of community patterns, yet is at variance with a wide range of experimental results involving the manipulation of environments or communities. One explanation for this discrepancy is that spatially explicit models where selection is generally weak, or where selection acts strongly on only a few species at each site, have essentially the same output as neutral models with respect to the distribution of abundance and the decay of similarity. Detecting a non-neutral signal in survey data requires careful spatial or phylogenetic analysis; we emphasize the potential utility of incorporating phylogenetic information in order to detect functional processes that lead to ecological variation among clades. © 2006 by the Ecological Society of America. },
    KEYWORDS = { Abundance Comparative method Distribution Drift Ecological specialization Heterogeneous environment Local adaptation Neutral model Niche Range Spatial ecology Species diversity },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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