LeiLechowicz1990

Référence

Lei, T.T., Lechowicz, M.J. (1990) Shade adaptation and shade tolerance in saplings of three Acer species from eastern North America. Oecologia, 84(2):224-228.

Résumé

Saplings of co-occurring maple species in a mature maple-beech forest differed in a suite of structural and physiological characters that separated the canopy species, Acer saccharum, from the sub-canopy, A. pensylvanicum and A. spicatum. Acer saccharum had both more dense wood and tougher and heavier but thinner leaves. Acer pensylvanicum had the largest, lightest leaves with high stomatal density and its canopy architecture was the most effective in terms of leaf display for light interception. Acer spicatum had weaker wood similar to that of A. pensylvanicum but also small, soft and relatively poorly displayed leaves. Both subcanopy species maintained marginally higher average rates of photosynthesis over the growing season in the understory environment. Only juvenile A. saccharum is shade-tolerant, capable of persisting through long periods in the closed canopy until a gap occurs but not specifically adapted to the understory environment. Juvenile A. saccharum appears to be constrained functionally by the requirements set by the canopy environment that adults will occupy. Investment in denser wood slows growth of saplings, but is necessary for structural reasons in the adult. Juvenile A. saccaharum have morphological and photosynthetic characters better suited to gas exchange and extension growth under the increased photon flux densities in large forest gaps, characteristics that will also be advantageous in the sunlit canopy environment of adults. Acer pensylvanicum has characteristics that enhance the potential for capture and utilization of sunflecks. Acer spicatum shares some shade-adapted features with A. pensylvanicum, and its habit of lateral spread through stem layering may confer an additional advantage in foraging for small gaps. -from Authors

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { LeiLechowicz1990,
    AUTHOR = { Lei, T.T. and Lechowicz, M.J. },
    TITLE = { Shade adaptation and shade tolerance in saplings of three Acer species from eastern North America },
    JOURNAL = { Oecologia },
    YEAR = { 1990 },
    VOLUME = { 84 },
    PAGES = { 224-228 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    NOTE = { 00298549 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 47 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus Language of Original Document: English },
    ABSTRACT = { Saplings of co-occurring maple species in a mature maple-beech forest differed in a suite of structural and physiological characters that separated the canopy species, Acer saccharum, from the sub-canopy, A. pensylvanicum and A. spicatum. Acer saccharum had both more dense wood and tougher and heavier but thinner leaves. Acer pensylvanicum had the largest, lightest leaves with high stomatal density and its canopy architecture was the most effective in terms of leaf display for light interception. Acer spicatum had weaker wood similar to that of A. pensylvanicum but also small, soft and relatively poorly displayed leaves. Both subcanopy species maintained marginally higher average rates of photosynthesis over the growing season in the understory environment. Only juvenile A. saccharum is shade-tolerant, capable of persisting through long periods in the closed canopy until a gap occurs but not specifically adapted to the understory environment. Juvenile A. saccharum appears to be constrained functionally by the requirements set by the canopy environment that adults will occupy. Investment in denser wood slows growth of saplings, but is necessary for structural reasons in the adult. Juvenile A. saccaharum have morphological and photosynthetic characters better suited to gas exchange and extension growth under the increased photon flux densities in large forest gaps, characteristics that will also be advantageous in the sunlit canopy environment of adults. Acer pensylvanicum has characteristics that enhance the potential for capture and utilization of sunflecks. Acer spicatum shares some shade-adapted features with A. pensylvanicum, and its habit of lateral spread through stem layering may confer an additional advantage in foraging for small gaps. -from Authors },
    KEYWORDS = { canopy architecture maple photosynthesis shade tolerance North America Acer pensylvanicum Acer saccharum Acer spicatum },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - ABC CBA 2020 ****************** **********************************************************

31 mai au 4 juin 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...