LeiLechowicz1997a

Référence

Lei, T.T., Lechowicz, M.J. (1997) The photosynthetic response of eight species of Acer to simulated light regimes from the centre and edges of gaps. Functional Ecology, 11(1):16-23.

Résumé

1. Seedlings of eight Acer species grown under two light treatments simulating forest gap edge (photosynthetic photon flux density, PPFD = 30 ?mol m-2s-1; R:FR = 0.6) and gap centre (PPFD = 400 ?mol m-2s-1; R:FR = 1.1) were studied to explore the effect of growth irradiance on transient- and steady-state photosynthesis. 2. The increase in maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)) from gap edge- to gap centre-grown seedlings ranged between 20% in Acer saccharum and 138% in Acer ginnala. A(max) differed significantly among species (2.3 to 12.3 ?mol m-2s-1) but assimilation rates under dim light (30 ?mol m-2s-1) were more similar (0.6 to 1.4 ?mol m-2s-1). 3. Significant differences among species in stomatal conductance indicate that species of high photosynthetic performance maintain higher dim light conductance and show a much greater excursion in stomatal opening under saturating light. 4. Lightfleck response based on actual photosynthetic rates was more rapid in gap centre- vs gap edge-grown plants but the latter demonstrated more rapid rates of photosynthetic induction (PI). 5. We suggest that the estimation of photosynthetic induction state is prone to an inverse relationship with maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)) and so may not be directly related to efficiency in sunfleck response. Conversely, higher A(max) can result in low PI but is also associated with higher transient rates of assimilation during a lightfleck and, therefore, be equally relevant as induction properties. 6. It appears that leaves with characters such as greater specific leaf mass and area-based leaf N, even within the same irradiance treatment, may confer a carboxylation advantage to sunfleck utilization not reflected in PI. However, whether the total carbon return on such a leaf is better assessed by PI or transient photosynthetic rate remains to be determined.

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@ARTICLE { LeiLechowicz1997a,
    AUTHOR = { Lei, T.T. and Lechowicz, M.J. },
    TITLE = { The photosynthetic response of eight species of Acer to simulated light regimes from the centre and edges of gaps },
    JOURNAL = { Functional Ecology },
    YEAR = { 1997 },
    VOLUME = { 11 },
    PAGES = { 16-23 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    NOTE = { 02698463 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 15 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: FECOE Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Lei, T.T.; Biology Department; Virginia Polytechnic Institute; State University Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States References: Bjo?rkman, O., Responses to different quantum flux densities (1981) Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology (NS) Physiological Plant Ecology II, 12 A, pp. 57-107. , (eds O. L. Lange, P. L. Nobel, C. B. Osmond \& H. Ziegler), Springer-Verlag, Berlin; Boardman, N.K., Comparative photosynthesis of sun and shade plants (1977) Annual Review of Plant Physiology, 28, pp. 355-377; Canham, C.D., Suppression and release during canopy recruitment in Acer saccharum (1985) Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, 112, pp. 134-145; Canham, C.D., Growth and canopy architecture of shade-tolerant trees: Response to canopy gaps (1988) Ecology, 69, pp. 786-795; Chazdon, R.L., Sunflecks and their importance to forest understory plants (1988) Advances in Ecological Research, 18, pp. 1-63; Chazdon, R.L., Pearcy, R.W., Photosynthetic responses to light variation in rainforest species. I. Induction under constant and fluctuating light conditions (1986) Oecologia, 69, pp. 517-523; Chazdon, R.L., Pearcy, R.W., Photosynthetic responses to light variation in rainforest species. II. Carbon gain and photosynthetic efficiency during light-flecks (1986) Oecologia, 69, pp. 524-531; Dunn, A., Arditti, J., (1968) Experimental Physiology. Experiments in Cellular, General and Plant Physiology, , Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York; Ehleringer, J., Bjo?rkman, O., Quantum yields for CO2 uptake in C3 and C4 plants. Dependence on temperature, CO2 and O2 concentration (1987) Plant Physiology, 59, pp. 86-90; Endler, J.A., The color of light in forests and its implications (1993) Ecological Monographs, 63, pp. 1-27; Evans, J.R., Photosynthetic acclimation and nitrogen partitioning within a lucerne canopy. I. Canopy characteristics (1993) Australian Journal of Plant Physiology, 20, pp. 55-67; Evans, J.R., Von Caemmerer, S., Adams III, W.W., (1988) Ecology of Photosynthesis in Sun and Shade, , CSIRO, Melbourne; Fried, J.S., Tappeiner II, J.C., Hibbs, D.E., Bigleaf maple seedling establishment and early growth in Douglas-fir forests (1988) Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 18, pp. 1226-1233; Gross, L.J., Photosynthetic dynamics in varying light environments: A model andits application to whole leaf carbon gain (1982) Ecology, 63, pp. 84-93; Gross, L.J., Chabot, B.F., Time course of photosynthetic response to changes in incident light energy (1979) Plant Physiology, 63, pp. 1033-1038; Kirschbaum, M.U.F., Pearcy, R.W., Gas exchange analysis of the relative importance of stomatal and biochemical factors in photosynthetic induction in Alocasia macrorrhiza (1988) Plant Physiology, 86, pp. 782-785; Kirschbaum, M.U.F., Pearcy, R.W., Gas exchange analysis of the fast phase of photosynthetic induction in Alocasia macrorrhiza (1988) Plant Physiology, 86, pp. 818-821; Kirschbaum, M.U.F., Gross, L.J., Pearcy, R.W., Observed and modelled stomatal responses to dynamic light environments in the shade plant Alocasia macrorrhiza (1988) Plant, Cell and Environment, 11, pp. 111-121; Ku?ppers, M., Schneider, H., Leaf gas exchange of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings in lightflecks: Effects of fleck length and leaf temperature in leaves grown in deep and partial shade (1993) Trees, 7, pp. 160-168; Lei, T.T., (1992) Functional Design and Shade Adaptation in Acer Species, , PhD thesis, McGill University, Montreal; Lei, T.T., Lechowicz, M.J., Shade adaptation and shade tolerance in saplings of three Acer species from eastern North America (1990) Oecologia, 84, pp. 224-228; Lei, T.T., Tabuchi, R., Kitao, M., Takahashi, K., Koike, T., Effects of weather, season and vertical position on the variation in light quantity and quality in a Japanese deciduous broadleaf forest (1996) Journal of Sustainable Forestry, , in press; Newell, E.A., McDonald, E.P., Strain, B.R., Denslow, J.S., Photosynthetic responses of Miconia species to canopy openings in a lowland tropical rainforest (1993) Oecologia, 94, pp. 49-56; Pearcy, R.W., The light environment and growth of C3 and C4 tree species in the understorey of a Hawaiian forest (1983) Oecologia, 58, pp. 19-25; Pearcy, R.W., Sunflecks and photosynthesis in plant canopies (1990) Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology, 41, pp. 421-453; Pearcy, R.W., Osteryoung, K., Calkin, H.W., Photosynthetic responses to dynamic light environment by Hawaiian trees (1985) Plant Physiology, 79, pp. 896-902; Pfitsch, W.A., Pearcy, R.W., Daily carbon gain by Adenocaulon bicolor (Asteraceae), a redwood forest understory herb, in relation to its light environment (1989) Oecologia, 80, pp. 465-470; Pfitsch, W.A., Pearcy, R.W., Steady-state and dynamic photosynthetic response of Adenocaulon bicolor (Asteraceae) in its redwood forest habitat (1989) Oecologia, 80, pp. 471-476; Potvin, C., Lechowicz, M.J., Tardif, S., The statistical analysis of ecophysiological response curves obtained from experiments involving repeated measures (1990) Ecology, 71, pp. 1389-1400; (1988) SAS/STAT User's Guide, Release 6.03, , SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC; Seemann, J.R., Kirschbaum, M.U.F., Sharkey, T.D., Pearcy, R.W., Regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity in Alocasia macrorrhiza in response to step changes in irradiance (1988) Plant Physiology, 88, pp. 148-152; Sims, D.A., Pearcy, R.W., Sunfleck frequency and duration affects growth rate of the understorey plant, Alocasia macrorrhiza (1993) Functional Ecology, 7, pp. 683-689; Sipe, T.W., Bazzaz, F.A., Gap partitioning among maples (Acer) in central New England: Shoot architecture and photosynthesis (1994) Ecology, 75, pp. 2318-2332; Sipe, T.W., Bazzaz, F.A., Gap partitioning among maples (Acer) in central New England: Survival and growth (1995) Ecology, 76, pp. 1587-1602; Tang, Y., Koizumi, H., Satoh, M., Izumi, W., Characteristics of transient photosynthesis in Quercus serrata seedlings grown under lightfleck and constant light regimes (1994) Oecologia, 100, pp. 463-469; Tinoco-Ojanguren, C., Pearcy, R.W., Dynamic stomatal behavior and its role in carbon gain during lightflecks of a gap phase and an understory Piper species acclimated to high and low light (1992) Oecologia, 92, pp. 222-228; Tinoco-Ojanguren, C., Pearcy, R.W., Stomatal dynamics and its importance to carbon gain in two rainforest Piper species. D. Stomatal versus biochemical limitations during photosynthetic induction (1993) Oecologia, 94, pp. 395-402; Wilson, B.F., Fischer, B.S., Striped maple: Shoot growth and bud formation related to light intensity (1977) Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 7, pp. 1-7; Woodrow, I.E., Mott, K.A., Rate limitation of non-steady state photosynthesis by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in spinach (1989) Australian Journal of Plant Physiology, 16, pp. 487-500. },
    ABSTRACT = { 1. Seedlings of eight Acer species grown under two light treatments simulating forest gap edge (photosynthetic photon flux density, PPFD = 30 ?mol m-2s-1; R:FR = 0.6) and gap centre (PPFD = 400 ?mol m-2s-1; R:FR = 1.1) were studied to explore the effect of growth irradiance on transient- and steady-state photosynthesis. 2. The increase in maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)) from gap edge- to gap centre-grown seedlings ranged between 20% in Acer saccharum and 138% in Acer ginnala. A(max) differed significantly among species (2.3 to 12.3 ?mol m-2s-1) but assimilation rates under dim light (30 ?mol m-2s-1) were more similar (0.6 to 1.4 ?mol m-2s-1). 3. Significant differences among species in stomatal conductance indicate that species of high photosynthetic performance maintain higher dim light conductance and show a much greater excursion in stomatal opening under saturating light. 4. Lightfleck response based on actual photosynthetic rates was more rapid in gap centre- vs gap edge-grown plants but the latter demonstrated more rapid rates of photosynthetic induction (PI). 5. We suggest that the estimation of photosynthetic induction state is prone to an inverse relationship with maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)) and so may not be directly related to efficiency in sunfleck response. Conversely, higher A(max) can result in low PI but is also associated with higher transient rates of assimilation during a lightfleck and, therefore, be equally relevant as induction properties. 6. It appears that leaves with characters such as greater specific leaf mass and area-based leaf N, even within the same irradiance treatment, may confer a carboxylation advantage to sunfleck utilization not reflected in PI. However, whether the total carbon return on such a leaf is better assessed by PI or transient photosynthetic rate remains to be determined. },
    KEYWORDS = { Aceraceae growth irradiance Maple photosynthetic induction stomatal conductance Amur maple canopy gap light photosynthetic photon flux density sugar maple Acer ginnala Acer saccharum Aceraceae },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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