MarquisBergeronSimardEtAl2021

Reference

Marquis, B., Bergeron, Y., Simard, M., Tremblay, M.F. (2021) Disentangling the effect of topography and microtopography on near-ground growing-season frosts at the boreal-temperate forest ecotone (Québec, Canada). New Forests. (URL )

Abstract

Permanent landscape attributes such as topography (elevation [m]) and microtopography (local variation in elevation [cm]) can increase the risk of cold air drainage down-slopes and in microtopographic depressions, causing important temperature gradients that generate localized growing-season frosts. Since most studies on growing-season frosts are restricted to the northern parts of the boreal forest or to mountainous areas, their negative consequences on tree productivity at the boreal-temperate forest ecotone is often ignored. We quantified the intensity and probability of growing-season frosts at the boreal-temperate forest ecotone in regard to topographic and microtopographic landscape attributes, which were extracted from airborne LiDAR surveys. In situ air temperature was measured for two summers (2016-2017) with 252 temperature loggers installed in two 18-years-old spruce plantations established in both temperate and boreal mixedwood forests. Growing-season frosts were more intense and probable at the boreal mixedwood forest site compared to the temperate forest site. Still, at both sites, when growing-season frost occurred, air temperature could vary by 4 °C along the elevation gradient of 15 m, often reaching sub-zero values at low elevation while reaching above-freezing values at high elevation. The importance of microtopography on the risk of sub-zero temperatures increased where frost events were less likely to occur such as at the temperate forest and at high elevation. Considering that growing-season frosts can considerably reduce tree productivity, the effects of both topography and planting microsite should be considered when determining where to establish plantations in the landscape and to determine suitable frost-free planting microsites within a plantation.

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@ARTICLE { MarquisBergeronSimardEtAl2021,
    AUTHOR = { Marquis, B. and Bergeron, Y. and Simard, M. and Tremblay, M.F. },
    JOURNAL = { New Forests },
    TITLE = { Disentangling the effect of topography and microtopography on near-ground growing-season frosts at the boreal-temperate forest ecotone (Québec, Canada) },
    YEAR = { 2021 },
    ISSN = { 1573-5095 },
    ABSTRACT = { Permanent landscape attributes such as topography (elevation [m]) and microtopography (local variation in elevation [cm]) can increase the risk of cold air drainage down-slopes and in microtopographic depressions, causing important temperature gradients that generate localized growing-season frosts. Since most studies on growing-season frosts are restricted to the northern parts of the boreal forest or to mountainous areas, their negative consequences on tree productivity at the boreal-temperate forest ecotone is often ignored. We quantified the intensity and probability of growing-season frosts at the boreal-temperate forest ecotone in regard to topographic and microtopographic landscape attributes, which were extracted from airborne LiDAR surveys. In situ air temperature was measured for two summers (2016-2017) with 252 temperature loggers installed in two 18-years-old spruce plantations established in both temperate and boreal mixedwood forests. Growing-season frosts were more intense and probable at the boreal mixedwood forest site compared to the temperate forest site. Still, at both sites, when growing-season frost occurred, air temperature could vary by 4 °C along the elevation gradient of 15 m, often reaching sub-zero values at low elevation while reaching above-freezing values at high elevation. The importance of microtopography on the risk of sub-zero temperatures increased where frost events were less likely to occur such as at the temperate forest and at high elevation. Considering that growing-season frosts can considerably reduce tree productivity, the effects of both topography and planting microsite should be considered when determining where to establish plantations in the landscape and to determine suitable frost-free planting microsites within a plantation. },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s11056-021-09840-7 },
    OWNER = { Daniel Lesieur },
    REFID = { Marquis2021 },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2021-03-08 },
    URL = { https://doi.org/10.1007/s11056-021-09840-7 },
}

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