ThiffaultCyrPregentEtAl2004

Référence

Thiffault, N., Cyr, G., Pregent, G., Jobidon, R. and Charette, L. (2004) Artificial regeneration of the black spruce ericaceous shrub: Effects of scarification, fertilization and the type of seedlings after 10 years [Régénération artificielle des pessières noires a  Éricacées: Effets du scarifiage, de la fertilisation et du type de plants après 10 ans]. Forestry Chronicle, 80(1):141-149. (Scopus )

Résumé

Site invasion by ericaceous shrubs after perturbation, either natural or human, is a major concern on some sites of the boreal forest of Québec. A dense cover of ericaceous shrubs often induces a conifer "growth check," which can last several decades. An interaction study was initiated in 1991 with the general objective of developing silvicultural strategies to ensure plantation success on such sites. Black spruce, jack pine, and tamarack seedlings were planted. Stock type, scarification, and fertilization treatments were organised in a randomized block split plot design. We measured seedling total height periodically over a ten-year period and assessed basal area and survival ten years after plantation. Most responses to treatments were additive. Results indicated that mechanical soil scarification is of major importance to ensure seedling growth, both in height and basal area, on spruce-ericaceous shrub sites of northeastern Québec. Scarification allowed a better expression of the site index, implying a sustainable impact on microsite characteristics that is greater than short-term effects on mineralization and nutrient availability. Fertilization positively influenced seedling growth, but less than soil scarification. Species choice had a strong impact on site productivity. Over a ten-year period, stock types only had a minor influence on plantation success, when compared to scarification or fertilization effects.

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@ARTICLE { ThiffaultCyrPregentEtAl2004,
    AUTHOR = { Thiffault, N. and Cyr, G. and Pregent, G. and Jobidon, R. and Charette, L. },
    TITLE = { Artificial regeneration of the black spruce ericaceous shrub: Effects of scarification, fertilization and the type of seedlings after 10 years [Régénération artificielle des pessières noires a  Éricacées: Effets du scarifiage, de la fertilisation et du type de plants après 10 ans] },
    JOURNAL = { Forestry Chronicle },
    YEAR = { 2004 },
    VOLUME = { 80 },
    PAGES = { 141-149 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    NOTE = { cited By 24 },
    ABSTRACT = { Site invasion by ericaceous shrubs after perturbation, either natural or human, is a major concern on some sites of the boreal forest of Québec. A dense cover of ericaceous shrubs often induces a conifer "growth check," which can last several decades. An interaction study was initiated in 1991 with the general objective of developing silvicultural strategies to ensure plantation success on such sites. Black spruce, jack pine, and tamarack seedlings were planted. Stock type, scarification, and fertilization treatments were organised in a randomized block split plot design. We measured seedling total height periodically over a ten-year period and assessed basal area and survival ten years after plantation. Most responses to treatments were additive. Results indicated that mechanical soil scarification is of major importance to ensure seedling growth, both in height and basal area, on spruce-ericaceous shrub sites of northeastern Québec. Scarification allowed a better expression of the site index, implying a sustainable impact on microsite characteristics that is greater than short-term effects on mineralization and nutrient availability. Fertilization positively influenced seedling growth, but less than soil scarification. Species choice had a strong impact on site productivity. Over a ten-year period, stock types only had a minor influence on plantation success, when compared to scarification or fertilization effects. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Black spruce; Ericaceous shrubs; Growth; Jack pine; Kalmia angustifolia; Regeneration; Survival; Tamarack },
    CODEN = { FRCRA },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    ISSN = { 00157546 },
    KEYWORDS = { Biodiversity; Perturbation techniques; Seed; Soils; Sustainable development, Artificial regeneration; Fertilization effects; Plot design; Site invasion, Forestry, biological invasion; fertilizer application; forestry production; plantation; regeneration; scarification; shrub, Canada; North America; Quebec, Coniferophyta; Kalmia; Kalmia angustifolia; Larix laricina; Picea; Picea mariana; Pinus banksiana },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-2442481763&partnerID=40&md5=bff3eacdeb6387b15bec3b4ad36f678b },
}

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