CullinghamJanesHamelinEtAl2019

Référence

Cullingham, C.I., Janes, J.K., Hamelin, R.C., James, P.M.A., Murray, B.W. and Sperling, F.A.H. (2019) The contribution of genetics and genomics to understanding the ecology of the mountain pine beetle system. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 49(7):721-730. (Scopus )

Résumé

Environmental change is altering forest insect dynamics worldwide. As these systems change, they pose significant ecological, social, and economic risk through, for example, the loss of valuable habitat, green space, and timber. Our understanding of such systems is often limited by the complexity of multiple interacting taxa. As a consequence, studies assessing the ecology, physiology, and genomics of each key organism in such systems are increasingly important for developing appropriate management strategies. Here we summarize the genetic and genomic contributions made by the TRIA project — a long-term study of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) system encompassing beetle, fungi, and pine. Contributions include genetic and genomic resources for species identification, sex determination, detection of selection, functional genetic analysis, mating system confirmation, hybrid stability tests, and integrated genetic studies of multiple taxa. These resources and subsequent findings have accelerated our understanding of the mountain pine beetle system, facilitating improved management strategies (e.g., enhancements to stand susceptibility indices and predictive models) and highlighting mechanisms for promoting resilient forests. Further, work from the TRIA project serves as a model for the increasing number and severity of invasive and native forest insect outbreaks globally (e.g., Dutch elm disease and thousand cankers disease). © 2019, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { CullinghamJanesHamelinEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { Cullingham, C.I. and Janes, J.K. and Hamelin, R.C. and James, P.M.A. and Murray, B.W. and Sperling, F.A.H. },
    TITLE = { The contribution of genetics and genomics to understanding the ecology of the mountain pine beetle system },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Forest Research },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 49 },
    NUMBER = { 7 },
    PAGES = { 721-730 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Environmental change is altering forest insect dynamics worldwide. As these systems change, they pose significant ecological, social, and economic risk through, for example, the loss of valuable habitat, green space, and timber. Our understanding of such systems is often limited by the complexity of multiple interacting taxa. As a consequence, studies assessing the ecology, physiology, and genomics of each key organism in such systems are increasingly important for developing appropriate management strategies. Here we summarize the genetic and genomic contributions made by the TRIA project — a long-term study of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) system encompassing beetle, fungi, and pine. Contributions include genetic and genomic resources for species identification, sex determination, detection of selection, functional genetic analysis, mating system confirmation, hybrid stability tests, and integrated genetic studies of multiple taxa. These resources and subsequent findings have accelerated our understanding of the mountain pine beetle system, facilitating improved management strategies (e.g., enhancements to stand susceptibility indices and predictive models) and highlighting mechanisms for promoting resilient forests. Further, work from the TRIA project serves as a model for the increasing number and severity of invasive and native forest insect outbreaks globally (e.g., Dutch elm disease and thousand cankers disease). © 2019, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada; Biology Department, Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, BC V9R 5W4, Canada; School of Environmental and Rural Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia; Department of Forest and Conservation Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada; Département de sciences biologiques, Université du Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada; Natural Resources and Environmental Studies Institute, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Dendroctonus; Forest management; Genomics; Grosmannia; Leptographium; Mountain pine beetle; Ophiostoma; Pinus; Population genetics },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Review },
    DOI = { 10.1139/cjfr-2018-0303 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85067548714&doi=10.1139%2fcjfr-2018-0303&partnerID=40&md5=ac7fed5c144d533effff961153f31ac1 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Mycorhizes_2019 ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...