BergeronBradleyMunsonEtAl2013

Référence

Bergeron, S.P., Bradley, R.L., Munson, A.D., Parsons, W.F.J. (2013) Physico-chemical and functional characteristics of soil charcoal produced at five different temperatures. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 58:140-146. (Scopus )

Résumé

The intensity of boreal forest wildfires is highly variable, such that natural wood charcoal can be produced at different peak temperatures. This, in turn, may have consequences on the physico-chemical and functional properties of the charcoal that is returned to soil. We report on a microcosm study where black spruce wood charcoal produced at five peak temperatures (450, 550, 650, 750 and 850 °C) was added to forest soils, and subsequently incubated at room temperature, with and without additions of condensed tannins and/or protein. A fourth experimental factor was added to this full factorial design, which comprised the mixing of soil so as to simulate mechanical scarification in the field. Increasing the charcoal production temperature resulted in higher O and %H, suggesting an increase in aromatic structures. Specific surface area was negligible at 450 °C, was about 50 m2 g−1 at 550 °C, and was 260–300 m2 g−1 at the three highest temperatures. At these higher charcoal production temperatures, 85–90 % of total surface area was attributed to pores <20 nm. The incubation demonstrated a decline in soil basal respiration (BR) with charcoal addition, with increasing charcoal production temperature and with tannin additions, whereas BR increased with protein addition and with soil mixing. Charcoal addition reduced soil microbial biomass (MB), however charcoal production temperature had no effect on MB. Consequently, we observed a decrease in microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) with increasing charcoal production temperature, which reflected the decline in BR. Increasing charcoal production temperature increased net View the MathML source production in the non-mixed soils, but decreased net View the MathML source production in the mixed soils. Protein additions increased net View the MathML source production more so in the mixed than in the non-mixed soils. Our results thus show that charcoal production temperature has a marked and significant effect on soil C and N cycling, and that these effects are substantially modified by soil mixing. This further suggests that changes in boreal forest fire intensity, due to anthropogenic changes in tree species composition or climate, could affect the dynamics of forest regeneration through variations in the chemical and functional properties of the charcoal, and that these effects may be substantially modified by post-fire silvicultural treatments such as mechanical scarification.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { BergeronBradleyMunsonEtAl2013,
    AUTHOR = { Bergeron, S.P. and Bradley, R.L. and Munson, A.D. and Parsons, W.F.J. },
    TITLE = { Physico-chemical and functional characteristics of soil charcoal produced at five different temperatures },
    JOURNAL = { Soil Biology and Biochemistry },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 58 },
    PAGES = { 140-146 },
    ABSTRACT = { The intensity of boreal forest wildfires is highly variable, such that natural wood charcoal can be produced at different peak temperatures. This, in turn, may have consequences on the physico-chemical and functional properties of the charcoal that is returned to soil. We report on a microcosm study where black spruce wood charcoal produced at five peak temperatures (450, 550, 650, 750 and 850 °C) was added to forest soils, and subsequently incubated at room temperature, with and without additions of condensed tannins and/or protein. A fourth experimental factor was added to this full factorial design, which comprised the mixing of soil so as to simulate mechanical scarification in the field. Increasing the charcoal production temperature resulted in higher O and %H, suggesting an increase in aromatic structures. Specific surface area was negligible at 450 °C, was about 50 m2 g−1 at 550 °C, and was 260–300 m2 g−1 at the three highest temperatures. At these higher charcoal production temperatures, 85–90 % of total surface area was attributed to pores <20 nm. The incubation demonstrated a decline in soil basal respiration (BR) with charcoal addition, with increasing charcoal production temperature and with tannin additions, whereas BR increased with protein addition and with soil mixing. Charcoal addition reduced soil microbial biomass (MB), however charcoal production temperature had no effect on MB. Consequently, we observed a decrease in microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) with increasing charcoal production temperature, which reflected the decline in BR. Increasing charcoal production temperature increased net View the MathML source production in the non-mixed soils, but decreased net View the MathML source production in the mixed soils. Protein additions increased net View the MathML source production more so in the mixed than in the non-mixed soils. Our results thus show that charcoal production temperature has a marked and significant effect on soil C and N cycling, and that these effects are substantially modified by soil mixing. This further suggests that changes in boreal forest fire intensity, due to anthropogenic changes in tree species composition or climate, could affect the dynamics of forest regeneration through variations in the chemical and functional properties of the charcoal, and that these effects may be substantially modified by post-fire silvicultural treatments such as mechanical scarification. },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.11.017 },
    ISSN = { 00380717 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Black spruce, Carbon and nitrogen mineralization, Charcoal chemistry, Fire intensity, Kalmia tannins, Soil microbial biomass, Soil mixing },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2013.01.07 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84871645284&partnerID=40&md5=b4bb79c90e36d37926158532e3d8f976 },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - ABC CBA 2020 ****************** **********************************************************

31 mai au 4 juin 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...