Laforest-LapointeMessierKembel2016

Référence

Laforest-Lapointe, I., Messier, C., Kembel, S.W. (2016) Tree phyllosphere bacterial communities: Exploring the magnitude of intra- and inter-individual variation among host species. PeerJ, 2016(8). (Scopus )

Résumé

Background. The diversity and composition of the microbial community of tree leaves (the phyllosphere) varies among trees and host species and along spatial, temporal, and environmental gradients. Phyllosphere community variation within the canopy of an individual tree exists but the importance of this variation relative to amongtree and among-species variation is poorly understood. Sampling techniques employed for phyllosphere studies include picking leaves from one canopy location to mixing randomly selected leaves from throughout the canopy. In this context, our goal was to characterize the relative importance of intra-individual variation in phyllosphere communities across multiple species, and compare this variation to inter-individual and interspecific variation of phyllosphere epiphytic bacterial communities in a natural temperate forest in Quebec, Canada. Methods. We targeted five dominant temperate forest tree species including angiosperms and gymnosperms: Acer saccharum, Acer rubrum, Betula papyrifera, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca. For one randomly selected tree of each species, we sampled microbial communities at six distinct canopy locations: bottom-canopy (1-2mheight), the four cardinal points of mid-canopy (2-4 m height), and the top-canopy (4-6 m height). We also collected bottom-canopy leaves from five additional trees from each species. Results. Based on an analysis of bacterial community structure measured via Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S gene, we demonstrate that 65% of the intra-individual variation in leaf bacterial community structure could be attributed to the effect of interindividual and inter-specific differences while the effect of canopy location was not significant. In comparison, host species identity explains 47% of inter-individual and inter-specific variation in leaf bacterial community structure followed by individual identity (32%) and canopy location (6%). Discussion. Our results suggest that individual samples from consistent positions within the tree canopy from multiple individuals per species can be used to accurately quantify variation in phyllosphere bacterial community structure. However, the considerable amount of intra-individual variation within a tree canopy ask for a better understanding of how changes in leaf characteristics and local abiotic conditions drive spatial variation in the phyllosphere microbiome. © 2016 Laforest-Lapointe et al.

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@ARTICLE { Laforest-LapointeMessierKembel2016,
    AUTHOR = { Laforest-Lapointe, I. and Messier, C. and Kembel, S.W. },
    TITLE = { Tree phyllosphere bacterial communities: Exploring the magnitude of intra- and inter-individual variation among host species },
    JOURNAL = { PeerJ },
    YEAR = { 2016 },
    VOLUME = { 2016 },
    NUMBER = { 8 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Background. The diversity and composition of the microbial community of tree leaves (the phyllosphere) varies among trees and host species and along spatial, temporal, and environmental gradients. Phyllosphere community variation within the canopy of an individual tree exists but the importance of this variation relative to amongtree and among-species variation is poorly understood. Sampling techniques employed for phyllosphere studies include picking leaves from one canopy location to mixing randomly selected leaves from throughout the canopy. In this context, our goal was to characterize the relative importance of intra-individual variation in phyllosphere communities across multiple species, and compare this variation to inter-individual and interspecific variation of phyllosphere epiphytic bacterial communities in a natural temperate forest in Quebec, Canada. Methods. We targeted five dominant temperate forest tree species including angiosperms and gymnosperms: Acer saccharum, Acer rubrum, Betula papyrifera, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca. For one randomly selected tree of each species, we sampled microbial communities at six distinct canopy locations: bottom-canopy (1-2mheight), the four cardinal points of mid-canopy (2-4 m height), and the top-canopy (4-6 m height). We also collected bottom-canopy leaves from five additional trees from each species. Results. Based on an analysis of bacterial community structure measured via Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S gene, we demonstrate that 65% of the intra-individual variation in leaf bacterial community structure could be attributed to the effect of interindividual and inter-specific differences while the effect of canopy location was not significant. In comparison, host species identity explains 47% of inter-individual and inter-specific variation in leaf bacterial community structure followed by individual identity (32%) and canopy location (6%). Discussion. Our results suggest that individual samples from consistent positions within the tree canopy from multiple individuals per species can be used to accurately quantify variation in phyllosphere bacterial community structure. However, the considerable amount of intra-individual variation within a tree canopy ask for a better understanding of how changes in leaf characteristics and local abiotic conditions drive spatial variation in the phyllosphere microbiome. © 2016 Laforest-Lapointe et al. },
    ART_NUMBER = { e2367 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Bioindicator; Inter-individual variation; Interspecific variation; Intraindividual variation; Microbiome; Phyllosphere; Plant-bacteria interaction; Temperate forest },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.7717/PEERJ.2367 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84992051099&partnerID=40&md5=70d670d4ad690e62bb2c3d2e0bfe48f8 },
}

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